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dc.contributor.authorD'Souza, Hanaen
dc.contributor.authorLathan, Amandaen
dc.contributor.authorKarmiloff-Smith, Annetteen
dc.contributor.authorMareschal, Denisen
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-14T00:30:52Z
dc.date.available2020-03-14T00:30:52Z
dc.date.issued2020-05en
dc.identifier.issn0891-4222
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/303437
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aims: Down syndrome (DS) is often characterised by intellectual disability with particular difficulties in expressive language. However, large individual differences exist in expressive language across development in DS. In the general population, one of the factors associated with variability in this domain is parental depression. We investigated whether this is also the case in young children with DS. Methods: Thirty-eight children with DS between 8 and 48 months of age participated in this study. Their parents reported on children’s receptive and expressive vocabularies (MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory) and on parental depression. Furthermore, an experimenter-led standardized developmental assessment (Mullen Scales of Early Learning) was administered to the children to test five domains: gross motor, fine motor, visual reception, receptive language, and expressive language. Results: A cross-sectional developmental trajectories analysis demonstrated that expressive language developed at a slower rate in children with DS whose parent reported depression than in those whose parent did not. No differences between groups were found in any other domain. Conclusion: Parental depression is associated with slower rate of expressive language development in young children with DS. These findings highlight that DS and parental depression may constitute a double hit leading to increased difficulties in the development of expressive language.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Wellcome Trust; The Waterloo Foundation; The Baily Thomas Charitable Fund; Newnham College, University of Cambridge; The Isaac Newton Trust
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectDown Syndromeen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectLanguage Developmenten
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectDepressive Disorderen
dc.subjectVocabularyen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectChild of Impaired Parentsen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.titleDown syndrome and parental depression: A double hit on early expressive language development.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2020en
prism.publicationNameResearch in developmental disabilitiesen
prism.startingPage103613
prism.volume100en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.50525
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-02-15en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.ridd.2020.103613en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-05en
dc.contributor.orcidD'Souza, Hana [0000-0001-8841-8644]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3379
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successTue Mar 31 10:35:57 BST 2020 - Embargo updated*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-03-16


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International