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dc.contributor.authorGarhart, Emilyen
dc.contributor.authorDeming, Drakeen
dc.contributor.authorMandell, Avien
dc.contributor.authorKnutson, Heather Aen
dc.contributor.authorWallack, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorBurrows, Adamen
dc.contributor.authorFortney, Jonathan Jen
dc.contributor.authorHood, Callieen
dc.contributor.authorSeay, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorSing, David Ken
dc.contributor.authorBenneke, Bjornen
dc.contributor.authorFraine, Jonathan Den
dc.contributor.authorKataria, Tiffanyen
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Nikoleen
dc.contributor.authorNikku, Madhusudhanen
dc.contributor.authorMcCullough, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Kevin Ben
dc.contributor.authorWakeford, Hannahen
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-26T13:57:17Z
dc.date.available2020-03-26T13:57:17Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-6256
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/303787
dc.description.abstractWe report 78 secondary eclipse depths for a sample of 36 transiting hot Jupiters observed at 3.6- and 4.5 microns using the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our eclipse results for 27 of these planets are new, and include highly irradiated worlds such as KELT-7b, WASP-87b, WASP-76b, and WASP-64b, and important targets for JWST such as WASP-62b. We find that WASP-62b has a slightly eccentric orbit e cos(omega) = 0.00614+/- 0.00064, and we confirm the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b and WASP-14b. The remainder are individually consistent with circular orbits, but we find statistical evidence for eccentricity increasing with orbital period in our range from 1 to 5 days. Our day-side brightness temperatures for the planets yield information on albedo and heat redistribution, following Cowan and Agol (2011). Planets having maximum day side temperatures exceeding ~ 2200K are consistent with zero albedo and distribution of stellar irradiance uniformly over the day-side hemisphere. Our most intriguing result is that we detect a systematic difference between the emergent spectra of these hot Jupiters as compared to blackbodies. The ratio of observed brightness temperatures, Tb(4.5)/Tb(3.6), increases with equilibrium temperature by 100 +/- 24 parts-per-million per Kelvin, over the entire temperature range in our sample (800K to 2500K). No existing model predicts this trend over such a large range of temperature. We suggest that this may be due to a structural difference in the atmospheric temperature profile between the real planetary atmospheres as compared to models.
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleStatistical Characterization of Hot Jupiter Atmospheres using Spitzer's Secondary Eclipsesen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameThe Astronomical Journalen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.50867
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-15en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3847/1538-3881/ab6cffen
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-01-15en
dc.contributor.orcidNikku, Madhusudhan [0000-0002-4869-000X]
dc.identifier.eissn1538-3881
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2020-02-28en
dc.identifier.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/ab6cffen


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