Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMinetti, Corrado
dc.contributor.authorPilotte, Nils
dc.contributor.authorZulch, Michael
dc.contributor.authorCanelas, Tiago
dc.contributor.authorTettevi, Edward J
dc.contributor.authorVeriegh, Francis BD
dc.contributor.authorOsei-Atweneboana, Mike Yaw
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Steven A
dc.contributor.authorReimer, Lisa J
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-21T03:16:52Z
dc.date.available2020-04-21T03:16:52Z
dc.date.issued2020-04
dc.date.submitted2019-11-22
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727
dc.identifier.otherpntd-d-19-01949
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/304573
dc.description.abstractWe recently developed a superhydrophobic cone-based method for the collection of mosquito excreta/feces (E/F) for the molecular xenomonitoring of vector-borne parasites showing higher throughput compared to the traditional approach. To test its field applicability, we used this platform to detect the presence of filarial and malaria parasites in two villages of Ghana and compared results to those for detection in mosquito carcasses and human blood. We compared the molecular detection of three parasites (Wuchereria bancrofti, Plasmodium falciparum and Mansonella perstans) in mosquito E/F, mosquito carcasses and human blood collected from the same households in two villages in the Savannah Region of the country. We successfully detected the parasite DNA in mosquito E/F from indoor resting mosquitoes, including W. bancrofti which had a very low community prevalence (2.5-3.8%). Detection in the E/F samples was concordant with detection in insect whole carcasses and human blood, and a parasite not vectored by mosquitoes was detected as well.Our approach to collect and test mosquito E/F successfully detected a variety of parasites at varying prevalence in the human population under field conditions, including a pathogen (M. perstans) which is not transmitted by mosquitoes. The method shows promise for further development and applicability for the early detection and surveillance of a variety of pathogens carried in human blood.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectResearch Article
dc.subjectMedicine and health sciences
dc.subjectBiology and life sciences
dc.titleField evaluation of DNA detection of human filarial and malaria parasites using mosquito excreta/feces.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2020-04-21T03:16:52Z
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationNamePLoS Negl Trop Dis
prism.volume14
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.51655
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-02-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pntd.0008175
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
datacite.contributor.supervisoreditor: Cantacessi, Cinzia
dc.contributor.orcidMinetti, Corrado [0000-0001-7862-4874]
dc.contributor.orcidPilotte, Nils [0000-0002-8447-7425]
dc.contributor.orcidZulch, Michael [0000-0001-5703-5675]
dc.contributor.orcidCanelas, Tiago [0000-0003-2064-8456]
dc.identifier.eissn1935-2735
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Charities Group (MR/P025285/1)
pubs.funder-project-idBill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1154992)
cam.issuedOnline2020-04-08


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)