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dc.contributor.authorParkes-Ratanshi, Rosalinden
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T23:30:15Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T23:30:15Z
dc.identifier.issn1448-5028
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/305695
dc.description.abstractBackground: Maternal syphilis causes poor birth outcomes, including congenital syphilis. Testing and treatment of partners prevents reinfection, but strategies to improve partner attendance are failing. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of three partner notification strategies. Methods: Pregnant women with a positive point-of-care treponemal test at three antenatal clinics (ANCs) in Kampala, Uganda, were randomised 1 : 1 : 1 to receive either notification slips (NS; standard of care), NS and a text messages (SMS) or NS and telephone calls. The primary outcome was the proportion of partners who attended the ANC and were treated for syphilis. Results: Between 2015 and 2016, 17 130 pregnant women were screened; 601 (3.5%) had a positive treponemal result, and 442 were enrolled in the study. Only 81 of 442 partners (18.3%; 23/152 (15.1%), 31/144 (21.5%) and 27/146 (18.5%) in the NS only, NS + SMS and NS + telephone call groups respectively) attended an ANC for follow-up; there were no significant differences between the groups. Twelve per cent of women attended the ANC with their male partner, and this proportion increased over time. Partner non-treatment was independently associated with adverse birth outcomes (odds ratio 2.75; 95% confidence interval 2.36–3.21; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Only 18.3% of partners of pregnant women who tested positive for syphilis received treatment. Female partners of non-attendant men had worse birth outcomes. Encouraging men to accompany women to the ANC and testing both may address the urgent need to treat partners of pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa to reduce poor fetal outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. 5U54EB007958 to Professor Charlotte Gaydos
dc.publisherCSIRO
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0
dc.title'Low male partner attendance after syphilis screening in pregnant women leads to worse birth outcomes; The Syphilis Treatment Of Partners (STOP) randomized controlled trialen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage222
prism.issueIdentifier3en
prism.publicationNameSexual Healthen
prism.startingPage214
prism.volume17en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.52773
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-10-09en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1071/SH19092en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-10-09en
dc.contributor.orcidParkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind [0000-0001-9297-1311]
dc.identifier.eissn1449-8987
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2020-06-12en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.publish.csiro.au/sh/SH19092en
cam.orpheus.successMon Apr 19 07:35:51 BST 2021 - The item has an open VoR version.*
cam.orpheus.counter3*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International