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dc.contributor.authorPrice, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorJanssens, Astriden
dc.contributor.authorNewlove-Delgado, Tamsinen
dc.contributor.authorEke, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Molien
dc.contributor.authorSaya, Kapilen
dc.contributor.authorHollis, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorAni, Corneliusen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorDunn-Morua, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorAsherson, Philipen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Stuarten
dc.contributor.authorFord, Tamsinen
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-06T23:31:49Z
dc.date.available2020-07-06T23:31:49Z
dc.identifier.issn2056-4724
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/307692
dc.description.abstractBackground: UK clinical guidelines recommend treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in adults by suitably qualified clinical teams. However, young people with ADHD attempting to transition from children’s services experience considerable difficulties in accessing care. Aims: To map the mental health services in the UK for adults who have ADHD and compare the reports of key stakeholders (people with ADHD and their carers, health workers, service commissioners). Method: A survey about the existence and extent of service provision for adults with ADHD was distributed online and via national organisations (e.g. Royal College of Psychiatrists, the ADHD Foundation). Freedom of information requests were sent to commissioners. Descriptive analysis was used to compare reports from the different stakeholders. Results: A total of 294 unique services were identified by 2686 respondents. Of these, 44 (15%) were dedicated adult ADHD services and 99 (34%) were generic adult mental health services. Only 12 dedicated services (27%) provided the full range of treatments recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Only half of the dedicated services (55%) and a minority of other services (7%) were reported by all stakeholder groups, (p<0.001, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions: There is geographical variation in the provision of NHS services for adults with ADHD across the UK, as well as limited availability of treatments in the available services. Differences between stakeholder reports raise questions about equitable access. With increasing numbers of young people with ADHD graduating from children’s services, developing evidence-based accessible models of care for adults with ADHD remains an urgent policy and commissioning priority.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was part of a wider study CATCh-uS. It was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research Programme (project number 14/21/52) and its development was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South West Peninsula.
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleMapping UK mental health services for adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder; survey findings, with an analysis of differences in reporting between stakeholder groupsen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameBJPsych Openen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.54785
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-29en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-06-29en
dc.contributor.orcidFord, Tamsin [0000-0001-5295-4904]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.counter65*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2023-07-06


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