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dc.contributor.authorCasamian-Sorrosal, Domingo
dc.contributor.authorSilvestrini, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorBlake, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorKortum, Andre
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Penny J
dc.contributor.authorMartínez, Yolanda
dc.contributor.authorLopez Alvarez, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorKeegan, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-14T07:09:21Z
dc.date.available2020-07-14T07:09:21Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-12
dc.date.submitted2018-09-21
dc.identifier.issn0042-4900
dc.identifier.othervetrec-2018-105193
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/307911
dc.description.abstractBackground: Canine idiopathic eosinophilic lung disease (ELD) is sparsely documented in the literature. Methods: Clinical presentation and outcome of dogs diagnosed with ELD (eosinophilic bronchitis or eosinophilic bronchopneumonia) were reviewed. Subgroups were made based on chronicity of clinical signs and findings of thoracic imaging: NCI (no changes in thoracic imaging), BRON (bronchial/peribronchial pattern), INT (bronchointerstitial/interstitial/alveolar). Results: Seventy cases were included. There were more young to adult, crossbreed and female dogs. Compared with the other two groups NCI dogs showed lower bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophilic pleocytosis and absence of circulating eosinophilia, bronchiectasis or death due to respiratory disease. All dogs responded clinically to corticosteroids. Median treatment duration was four months. Remission (no clinical signs after treatment discontinuation for >one month) and long-term remission (>six months) was achieved in 60 per cent, and 51 per cent of patients, respectively. Relapse occurred in 26 per cent of cases after remission but was rare (3 per cent) after long-term remission. The one-year, two-year and four-year survival to death due to respiratory disease was 98 per cent, 97 per cent and 91 per cent, respectively. Conclusion: Prognosis and initial clinical response for ELD was generally good although achievement of long-term remission was only seen in 51 per cent of dogs. Different outcomes based on chronicity of signs, corticosteroid dose, thoracic imaging abnormalities and other clinical variables were not appreciated.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectOriginal research
dc.subject2477
dc.subjecteosinophilic bronchopneumopathy
dc.subjectasthma
dc.subjecteosinophilic bronchitis
dc.subjectendoscopy
dc.titleClinical features and long-term follow-up of 70 cases of canine idiopathic eosinophilic lung disease
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2020-07-14T07:09:21Z
prism.publicationNameVeterinary Record
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.55004
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-28
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/vr.105193
rioxxterms.versionVoR
dc.contributor.orcidCasamian-Sorrosal, Domingo [0000-0002-5973-8881]
dc.contributor.orcidKortum, Andre [0000-0002-9760-733X]
dc.contributor.orcidWatson, Penny J [0000-0002-7241-9412]
dc.identifier.eissn2042-7670


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