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dc.contributor.authorVatansever, Denizen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Shouyanen
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, Barbaraen
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-16T00:50:57Z
dc.date.available2020-07-16T00:50:57Z
dc.date.issued2021-01en
dc.identifier.issn0893-133X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/308005
dc.description.abstractTime and research will be of the essence when deducing the long-term consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic for global mental health and emotional well-being. Prior reports from viral outbreaks and emerging evidence from the recent pandemic point towards a potential “tsunami” of stress-related disorders in the aftermath of such traumatic events [1]. In addition to neurological and psychiatric symptoms, including psychosis and neurocognitive dementia-like symptoms observed in Covid-19 patients [2], world-wide surveys at the height of the pandemic suggest increased reports of depression, anxiety and distress across a considerable proportion of medical staff as well as the general public [3]. Grief for the loss of loved ones, helplessness and excessive worry over contracting or spreading the virus to other family members are all significant stressors that may collectively contribute to an imminent rise in symptoms of depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation. Furthermore, social distancing measures for combating the viral outbreak may also have unintended consequences such as social isolation, loneliness, abrupt changes to daily habits, unemployment and financial insecurity, which have all been characterised as risk factors for major depressive and post-traumatic stress disorders with potentially long-lasting effects on brain physiology and function.
dc.description.sponsorshipNIHR Brain Injury MedTech and in vitro diagnostics Co-operative (MIC), Cambridge and the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre (Mental Health Theme and Neurodegeneration Theme). In addition, BJS thanks the Wallitt Foundation and Eton College for funding.
dc.format.mediumPrinten
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMeditationen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectStress, Psychologicalen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectTelemedicineen
dc.subjectComputers, Handhelden
dc.subjectDelivery of Health Careen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectSmartphoneen
dc.subjectCOVID-19en
dc.titleCovid-19 and promising solutions to combat symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage218
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2021en
prism.publicationNameNeuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacologyen
prism.startingPage217
prism.volume46en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.55101
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41386-020-00791-9en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-01en
dc.contributor.orcidVatansever, Deniz [0000-0002-2494-9945]
dc.contributor.orcidSahakian, Barbara [0000-0001-7352-1745]
dc.identifier.eissn1740-634X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successTue Sep 01 09:01:49 BST 2020 - Embargo updated*
cam.orpheus.counter6*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-02-13


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