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dc.contributor.authorHonary, Mahsaen
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Veronicaen
dc.contributor.authorWalzlowski, Theodoreen
dc.contributor.authorHelal, Sumien
dc.contributor.authorVon Oertzen, Hans-Henningen
dc.contributor.authorHonary, Souroushen
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-18T15:19:53Z
dc.date.available2020-08-18T15:19:53Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/309325
dc.description.abstractIn the absence of a vaccine or e ective treatments, governments around the world are looking for ways to get people safely back to work. ‘Lockdown’ has proved successful in slowing the transmission of the virus, but its economic and social consequences are becoming increasingly catastrophic, having cost the worldwide economy around USD 40 billion to date, with estimated economic losses of USD 1 – 2.7 trillion through 2020. Restarting the economy without triggering a new wave of infections is clearly a priority for governments and businesses alike. But how do you reassure an anxious workforce that its employers will do everything in their power to protect them from infection? We are already seeing headline-grabbing examples of outbreaks in the workplace, such as the US food processing plant which saw nearly 40% of its 2,200 employees test positive in just under a week. To avoid incidents of this kind, governments around the world are setting out operational guidance for businesses preparing for a new way of working. While these recommendations are – rightly - informed by expert advice from clinicians, epidemiologists, infectious disease and public health specialists, they have thus far ignored the critical role technology could play in making the workplace a safer place for employees. We think that the conditional logic and rule-based systems of computer science coupled with IoT technology can provide organizations with a visualization and management tool that could help protect their workforces and provide them with much needed reassurance. In this paper, we consider the application of a simple, unobtrusive and inexpensive digital device – the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) enterprise tag – which, when used in conjunction with site maps and context-based rules, could enable businesses to gradually return to pre-Covid operations under a “new normal” de nition gradually and safely.
dc.description.sponsorshipEPSRC New Industrial Systems: OMMS - Optimising Me Manufacturing System [EP/R022534/1]
dc.publisherACM
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.titleGetting the country back to work, safely: A digital solutionen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameDigital Government: Research and Practiceen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.56416
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-03en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-08-03en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.counter70*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2023-08-18


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