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dc.contributor.authorSklair, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorGlucksberg, Lunaen
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-19T23:31:52Z
dc.date.available2020-08-19T23:31:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn0038-0261
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/309423
dc.description.abstractIn the resurgence of interest in inheritance flows following the publication of Piketty’s work, little attention has been paid to the affective practices that ensure the success of inheritance processes as wealth moves down generations of dynastic families. This article explores these practices, drawing on research among wealth managers, philanthropy advisors, family offices and their clients, to show how philanthropy is promoted by advisors to the wealthy as a tool to support inheritance and family business succession planning. In this process, advisors draw on the philanthropic imagination to style wealthy families as custodians of both private capital and the common good, thus mirroring the narratives used by philanthrocapitalists to legitimise their wealth in the public sphere. Here, however, the discourse of philanthrocapitalism is turned inwards to the private realm of the family, to persuade younger generations to rally around the collective project of the custodianship of wealth. By bringing together research on philanthropy and inheritance, this article contributes to the growing sociological literature on elites and the global inequalities driven by their accumulation of wealth. It shows how wealth accumulation is increasingly dependent not only on the mechanics of financial markets and inheritance flows, but also on affective wealth management strategies framed around ethical notions of kinship and social responsibility.
dc.description.sponsorshipParts of the research on which this article is based were kindly funded by the Royal Anthropological Institute (Sklair, Emslie Horniman Fund/Sutasoma Award 2008) and the ESRC (Sklair, Postdoctoral Fellowship 2018-2019)
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherSAGE
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectelitesen
dc.subjectfamily officesen
dc.subjectinheritanceen
dc.subjectphilanthropyen
dc.subjectwealth managersen
dc.titlePhilanthrocapitalism as wealth management strategy: Philanthropy, inheritance and succession planning among the global eliteen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage329
prism.issueIdentifier2en
prism.publicationDate2021en
prism.publicationNameThe Sociological Reviewen
prism.startingPage314
prism.volume69en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.56512
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-04en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/0038026120963479en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-03-01en
dc.contributor.orcidSklair, Jessica [0000-0002-1401-4521]
dc.identifier.eissn1467-954X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2020-10-13en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038026120963479#_backmatter_acken
cam.orpheus.successMon Dec 07 07:32:03 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
cam.orpheus.counter11*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International