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dc.contributor.authorYu, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMenviel, Len
dc.contributor.authorJin, ZDen
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, RFen
dc.contributor.authorJian, Zen
dc.contributor.authorPiotrowski, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorMa, Xen
dc.contributor.authorRohling, EJen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Fen
dc.contributor.authorMarino, Gen
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, JFen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-09T23:31:23Z
dc.date.available2020-09-09T23:31:23Z
dc.identifier.issn1752-0894
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/310099
dc.description.abstract© 2020, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited. Ocean circulation critically affects the global climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide through redistribution of heat and carbon in the Earth system. Despite intensive research, the nature of past ocean circulation changes remains elusive. Here we present deep-water carbonate ion concentration reconstructions for widely distributed locations in the Atlantic Ocean, where low carbonate ion concentrations indicate carbon-rich waters. These data show a low-carbonate-ion water mass that extended northward up to about 20° S in the South Atlantic at 3–4 km depth during the Last Glacial Maximum. In combination with radiocarbon ages, neodymium isotopes and carbon isotopes, we conclude that this low-carbonate-ion signal reflects a widespread expansion of carbon-rich Pacific deep waters into the South Atlantic, revealing a glacial deep Atlantic circulation scheme different than commonly considered. Comparison of high-resolution carbonate ion records from different water depths in the South Atlantic indicates that this Pacific deep-water expansion developed from approximately 38,000 to 28,000 years ago. We infer that its associated carbon sequestration may have contributed critically to the contemporaneous decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide, thereby helping to initiate the glacial maximum.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleLast glacial atmospheric CO<inf>2</inf> decline due to widespread Pacific deep-water expansionen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameNature Geoscienceen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.57185
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-11en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41561-020-0610-5en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-06-11en
dc.identifier.eissn1752-0908
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idNERC (NE/F006047/1)
pubs.funder-project-idNERC (NE/K005235/1)
cam.issuedOnline2020-07-20en
cam.orpheus.successMon Sep 14 09:22:30 BST 2020 - Embargo updated*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-01-20


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