Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKershenbaum, Anne
dc.contributor.authorCardinal, Rudolf
dc.contributor.authorChen, Shanquan
dc.contributor.authorUnderwood, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorSeyedsalehi, Aida
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorRubinsztein, Judy Sasha
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-21T00:31:07Z
dc.date.available2020-11-21T00:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2021-04
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/313191
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown increased rates of death and dementia in older people in specific serious mental illnesses (SMI) such as bipolar disorder or depression. We examined the rates of death and dementia in older people referred into a secondary care psychiatric service across a range of SMIs. METHODS: We used an anonymised dataset across 6 consecutive years with 28,340 patients aged 65 years and older from a single secondary care psychiatric trust in the United Kingdom. We identified deaths and incident dementia in patients with bipolar disorder/mania, schizophrenia, recurrent depression and anxiety disorders. We compared mortality and dementia rates between these diagnostic groups and in different treatment settings. We also examined mortality rates and dementia rates compared with general population rates. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia showed the highest hazard rate for death compared to other groups with SMIs (hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.1, with anxiety group the reference). Survival was reduced in patients referred to liaison psychiatry services. There were no significant differences between the SMI groups in terms of rates of dementia. However, risks of death and dementia were significantly increased compared to the general population (standardized mortality rates with 95% CI, 2.6(2.0-3.3), 3.5(2.6-4.5), 2.5(2.0-3.0) and 1.8 (1.4-2.2) and standardized dementia incidence rates with 95% CI, 2.7(1.5-4.1), 2.9(1.5-4.7), 3.8(2.6-5.2) and 4.3 (3.0-5.7) for bipolar disorder/mania, schizophrenia, recurrent depression and anxiety disorders respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults referred into an old age psychiatry service show higher rates of dementia and death than those reported for the general population.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectMental Health Services
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectSecondary Care
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.titleInvestigation of risk of dementia diagnosis and death in patients in older people's secondary care mental health services.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage582
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationDate2021
prism.publicationNameInt J Geriatr Psychiatry
prism.startingPage573
prism.volume36
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.60296
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-10-18
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/gps.5455
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-04
dc.contributor.orcidKershenbaum, Anne [0000-0001-9811-5866]
dc.contributor.orcidCardinal, Rudolf [0000-0002-8751-5167]
dc.contributor.orcidChen, Shanquan [0000-0002-4724-4892]
dc.contributor.orcidUnderwood, Benjamin [0000-0003-3427-9487]
dc.contributor.orcidSeyedsalehi, Aida [0000-0002-3949-2386]
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1166
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_PC_17213)
cam.issuedOnline2020-11-04


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International