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dc.contributor.authorFranks, Victoriaen
dc.contributor.authorEwen, John Gen
dc.contributor.authorMcCready, Mhairien
dc.contributor.authorThorogood, Roseen
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-27T00:31:28Z
dc.date.available2020-11-27T00:31:28Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-25en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/313441
dc.description.abstractEarly independence from parents is a critical period where social information acquired vertically may become outdated, or conflict with new information. However, across natural populations it is unclear if newly-independent young persist in using information from parents, or if group-level effects of conformity override previous behaviours. Here we test if wild juvenile hihi (Notiomystis cincta, a New Zealand passerine) retain a foraging behaviour from parents, or if they change in response to the behaviour of peers. We provided feeding stations to parents during chick-rearing to seed alternative access routes, and then tracked their offspring’s behaviour. Once independent, juveniles formed mixed-treatment social groups, where they did not retain preferences from their time with parents. Instead, juvenile groups converged over time to use one access route¬ per group, and juveniles that moved between groups switched to copy the locally-favoured option. Juvenile hihi did not copy specific individuals, even if they were more familiar with the preceding bird. Our study shows that early social experiences with parents affect initial foraging decisions, but social environments encountered later on can update transmission of arbitrary behaviours. This suggests that conformity may be widespread in animal groups, with potential cultural, ecological, and evolutionary consequences.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank the Department of Conservation and Supporters of Tiritiri Matangi for their assistance during this study. We are grateful to Neeltje Boogert, Lucy Aplin, and Erica van de Waal for helpful discussions on study design and analyses, and two anonymous reviewers whose comments greatly improved the manuscript. VF was supported by a Balfour PhD studentship (Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge); RT was supported by an Independent Research Fellowship from the Natural Environment Research Council UK (NE/K00929X/1) and a start-up grant from the Helsinki Institute of Life Science (HiLIFE), University of Helsink
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectPasseriformesen
dc.subjectSongbirdsen
dc.subjectFeeding Behavioren
dc.subjectSocial Behavioren
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectSocial Environmenten
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleForaging behaviour alters with social environment in a juvenile songbird.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1939en
prism.publicationDate2020en
prism.publicationNameProceedings. Biological sciencesen
prism.startingPage20201878
prism.volume287en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.60548
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-11-03en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2020.1878en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11-25en
dc.contributor.orcidFranks, Victoria [0000-0003-4861-3036]
dc.contributor.orcidEwen, John G [0000-0001-6402-1378]
dc.contributor.orcidThorogood, Rose [0000-0001-5010-2177]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idNERC (NE/K00929X/1)


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