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dc.contributor.authorLi, Shuai
dc.contributor.authorHua, Xinyang
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-03T16:16:06Z
dc.date.available2021-02-03T16:16:06Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-03
dc.date.submitted2020-11-12
dc.identifier.others12920-021-00887-1
dc.identifier.other887
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/317084
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Background: Lifestyle factors including obesity and smoking are suggested to be correlated with increased risk of COVID-19 severe illness or related death. However, whether these relationships are causal is not well known; neither for the relationships between COVID-19 severe illness and other common lifestyle factors, such as physical activity and alcohol consumption. Methods: Genome-wide significant genetic variants associated with body mass index (BMI), lifetime smoking, physical activity and alcohol consumption identified by large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of up to 941,280 individuals were selected as instrumental variables. Summary statistics of the genetic variants on severe illness of COVID-19 were obtained from GWAS analyses of up to 6492 cases and 1,012,809 controls. Two-sample Mendelian randomisation analyses were conducted. Results: Both per-standard deviation (SD) increase in genetically predicted BMI and lifetime smoking were associated with about two-fold increased risks of severe respiratory COVID-19 and COVID-19 hospitalization (all P < 0.05). Per-SD increase in genetically predicted physical activity was associated with decreased risks of severe respiratory COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05, 0.74; P = 0.02), but not with COVID-19 hospitalization (OR = 0.44; 95% CI 0.18, 1.07; P = 0.07). No evidence of association was found for genetically predicted alcohol consumption. Similar results were found across robust Mendelian randomisation methods. Conclusions: Evidence is found that BMI and smoking causally increase and physical activity might causally decrease the risk of COVID-19 severe illness. This study highlights the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle in protecting from COVID-19 severe illness and its public health value in fighting against COVID-19 pandemic.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectResearch Article
dc.subjectGenomic epidemiology
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectLifestyle factors
dc.subjectMendelian randomisation
dc.subjectCausation assessment
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectSmoking
dc.subjectAlcohol consumption
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.titleModifiable lifestyle factors and severe COVID-19 risk: a Mendelian randomisation study
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-02-03T16:16:06Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameBMC Medical Genomics
prism.volume14
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.64194
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s12920-021-00887-1
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidLi, Shuai [0000-0002-8696-8594]
dc.identifier.eissn1755-8794
pubs.funder-project-idVictorian Cancer Agency (ECRF19020)


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Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)