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dc.contributor.authorJackson, Jade B
dc.contributor.authorO'Daly, Owen
dc.contributor.authorMakovac, Elena
dc.contributor.authorMedina, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorRubio, Alfonso de Lara
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Stephen B
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Steve CR
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Matthew A
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-02T00:31:08Z
dc.date.available2021-03-02T00:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-01
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/318268
dc.description.abstractFunctional neuroimaging techniques have provided great insight in the field of pain. Utilising these techniques, we have characterised pain-induced responses in the brain and improved our understanding of key pain-related phenomena. Despite the utility of these methods, there remains a need to assess the test retest reliability of pain modulated blood-oxygen-level-dependant (BOLD) MR signal across repeated sessions. This is especially the case for more novel yet increasingly implemented stimulation modalities, such as noxious pressure, and it is acutely important for multi-session studies considering treatment efficacy. In the present investigation, BOLD signal responses were estimated for noxious-pressure stimulation in a group of healthy participants, across two separate sessions. Test retest reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and self-reported visual analogue scale measures were determined by the intra-class correlation coefficient. High levels of reliability were observed in several key brain regions known to underpin the pain experience, including in the thalamus, insula, somatosensory cortices, and inferior frontal regions, alongside "excellent" reliability of self-reported pain measures. These data demonstrate that BOLD-fMRI derived signals are a valuable tool for quantifying noxious responses pertaining to pressure stimulation. We further recommend the implementation of pressure as a stimulation modality in experimental applications.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPain
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectPain Measurement
dc.subjectBrain Mapping
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectPressure
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectSelf Report
dc.subjectNociception
dc.titleNoxious pressure stimulation demonstrates robust, reliable estimates of brain activity and self-reported pain.
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2020
prism.publicationNameNeuroimage
prism.startingPage117178
prism.volume221
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.65385
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-07-14
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.117178
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11
dc.contributor.orcidJackson, J.B. [0000-0002-9066-2627]
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9572
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2020-07-22


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International