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dc.contributor.authorJones, Cerith
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Gordon
dc.contributor.authorMullins, Alex J
dc.contributor.authorJenner, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorBull, Matthew J
dc.contributor.authorDashti, Yousef
dc.contributor.authorSpilker, Theodore
dc.contributor.authorParkhill, Julian
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Thomas R
dc.contributor.authorLiPuma, John J
dc.contributor.authorChallis, Gregory L
dc.contributor.authorMahenthiralingam, Eshwar
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-06T23:30:21Z
dc.date.available2021-05-06T23:30:21Z
dc.date.issued2021-01
dc.identifier.issn2057-5858
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/322064
dc.description.abstractBurkholderia gladioli is a bacterium with a broad ecology spanning disease in humans, animals and plants, but also encompassing multiple beneficial interactions. It is a plant pathogen, a toxin-producing food-poisoning agent, and causes lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Contrasting beneficial traits include antifungal production exploited by insects to protect their eggs, plant protective abilities and antibiotic biosynthesis. We explored the genomic diversity and specialized metabolic potential of 206 B. gladioli strains, phylogenomically defining 5 clades. Historical disease pathovars (pv.) B. gladioli pv. allicola and B. gladioli pv. cocovenenans were distinct, while B. gladioli pv. gladioli and B. gladioli pv. agaricicola were indistinguishable; soft-rot disease and CF infection were conserved across all pathovars. Biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for toxoflavin, caryoynencin and enacyloxin were dispersed across B. gladioli, but bongkrekic acid and gladiolin production were clade-specific. Strikingly, 13 % of CF infection strains characterized were bongkrekic acid-positive, uniquely linking this food-poisoning toxin to this aspect of B. gladioli disease. Mapping the population biology and metabolite production of B. gladioli has shed light on its diverse ecology, and by demonstrating that the antibiotic trimethoprim suppresses bongkrekic acid production, a potential therapeutic strategy to minimize poisoning risk in CF has been identified.
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherMicrobiology Society
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBurkholderia gladioli
dc.subjectCystic Fibrosis
dc.subjectBongkrekic Acid
dc.subjectTrimethoprim
dc.subjectFood Microbiology
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectPlant Diseases
dc.subjectBiosynthetic Pathways
dc.subjectHigh-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
dc.subjectWhole Genome Sequencing
dc.titleKill and cure: genomic phylogeny and bioactivity of Burkholderia gladioli bacteria capable of pathogenic and beneficial lifestyles.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationDate2021
prism.publicationNameMicrob Genom
prism.volume7
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.69523
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1099/mgen.0.000515
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-01
dc.contributor.orcidParkhill, Julian [0000-0002-7069-5958]
dc.identifier.eissn2057-5858
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/L021692/1)
cam.issuedOnline2021-01-18


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International