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dc.contributor.authorHastie, Claire Een
dc.contributor.authorMackay, Daniel Fen
dc.contributor.authorClemens, Tom Len
dc.contributor.authorCherrie, Mark PCen
dc.contributor.authorMegaw, Lauren Jen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Gordonen
dc.contributor.authorStock, Sarah Jen
dc.contributor.authorDibben, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorPell, Jill Pen
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T23:31:26Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T23:31:26Z
dc.date.issued2021-07en
dc.identifier.issn2047-9980
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/322921
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Risk of pre-eclampsia varies by month of delivery. We tested whether this seasonal patterning may be mediated through maternal vitamin D concentration using antenatal exposure to ultraviolet B radiation as an instrumental variable. Methods and Results Scottish maternity records were linked to antenatal ultraviolet B exposure derived from satellites between 2000 and 2010. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the association between ultraviolet B and pre-eclampsia, adjusting for the potential confounding effects of month of conception, child’s sex, gestation, parity and mean monthly temperature. Of the 522,896 eligible, singleton deliveries, 8,689 (1.66%) mothers developed pre-eclampsia. Total antenatal ultraviolet B exposure ranged from 43.18kJ/m2 to 101.11kJ/m2 and was associated with reduced risk of pre-eclampsia with evidence of a dose-response relationship (highest quintile of exposure: adjusted OR 0.57; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.72; p<0.001). Associations were demonstrated for ultraviolet B exposure in all three trimesters. Conclusions The seasonal patterning of pre-eclampsia may be mediated through low maternal vitamin D concentration in winter resulting from low ultraviolet B radiation. Interventional studies are required to determine whether vitamin D supplements, or ultraviolet B emitting light boxes, can reduce the seasonal patterning of pre-eclampsia.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Health Data Research UK [Edin-1 to CEH]. Provision of the UV data was funded by a joint Natural Environment Research Council, Medical Research Council and Chief Scientist Office project grant [ NE/P010911/1]; Tommy’s charity; and Health Data Research UK funding [Edin-1]. SJS is funded by Wellcome Trust Clinical Career Development Fellowship [ 209560/Z/17/Z].
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleAntenatal Exposure to UV-B Radiation and Preeclampsia: A Retrospective Cohort Study.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier13en
prism.publicationDate2021en
prism.publicationNameJournal of the American Heart Associationen
prism.startingPagee020246
prism.volume10en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.70377
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-17en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1161/jaha.120.020246en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-07en
dc.contributor.orcidSmith, Gordon [0000-0003-2124-0997]
dc.identifier.eissn2047-9980
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.counter5*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2024-05-24


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