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dc.contributor.authorSchnell, Alexandra K.
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Nicola S.
dc.contributor.authorHanlon, Roger T.
dc.contributor.authorJozet-Alves, Christelle
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-02T10:31:13Z
dc.date.available2021-09-02T10:31:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-18
dc.date.submitted2021-05-05
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.otherrspb20211052
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/327495
dc.descriptionFunder: European Research Council
dc.descriptionFunder: Grass Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100001654
dc.descriptionFunder: Royal Society; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000288
dc.descriptionFunder: Fyssen Foundation
dc.descriptionFunder: Australian Government; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100015539
dc.description.abstractEpisodic memory, remembering past experiences based on unique what–where–when components, declines during ageing in humans, as does episodic-like memory in non-human mammals. By contrast, semantic memory, remembering learnt knowledge without recalling unique what–where–when features, remains relatively intact with advancing age. The age-related decline in episodic memory likely stems from the deteriorating function of the hippocampus in the brain. Whether episodic memory can deteriorate with age in species that lack a hippocampus is unknown. Cuttlefish are molluscs that lack a hippocampus. We test both semantic-like and episodic-like memory in sub-adults and aged-adults nearing senescence (n = 6 per cohort). In the semantic-like memory task, cuttlefish had to learn that the location of a food resource was dependent on the time of day. Performance, measured as proportion of correct trials, was comparable across age groups. In the episodic-like memory task, cuttlefish had to solve a foraging task by retrieving what–where–when information about a past event with unique spatio-temporal features. In this task, performance was comparable across age groups; however, aged-adults reached the success criterion (8/10 correct choices in consecutive trials) significantly faster than sub-adults. Contrary to other animals, episodic-like memory is preserved in aged cuttlefish, suggesting that memory deterioration is delayed in this species.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.subjectNeuroscience and cognition
dc.subjectResearch articles
dc.subjectwhat–where–when memory
dc.subjectageing
dc.subjectsemantic-like memory
dc.subjecttime-place learning
dc.subjectcephalopod cognition
dc.subjectcomparative cognition
dc.titleEpisodic-like memory is preserved with age in cuttlefish
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-09-02T10:31:12Z
prism.issueIdentifier1957
prism.publicationNameProceedings of the Royal Society B
prism.volume288
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.74948
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-07-22
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2021.1052
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidSchnell, Alexandra K. [0000-0001-9223-0724]
dc.contributor.orcidClayton, Nicola S. [0000-0003-1835-423X]
dc.contributor.orcidHanlon, Roger T. [0000-0003-0004-5674]
dc.contributor.orcidJozet-Alves, Christelle [0000-0002-9372-2306]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
pubs.funder-project-idSeventh Framework Programme (3399933, FP7/2007)


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