Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBastos, Carlos A. P.
dc.contributor.authorThom, William D.
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Beth
dc.contributor.authorBatalha, Iris L.
dc.contributor.authorBurge Rogers, Maedee L.
dc.contributor.authorMcCrone, Ian S.
dc.contributor.authorFaria, Nuno
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Jonathan J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-15T15:23:20Z
dc.date.available2021-09-15T15:23:20Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-15
dc.date.submitted2020-02-25
dc.identifier.others41598-020-71586-7
dc.identifier.other71586
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/328066
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Bandaging is a steadfast but time-consuming component of wound care with limited technical advancements to date. Bandages must be changed and infection risk managed. Rapid-set liquid bandages are efficient alternatives but lack durability or inherent infection control. We show here that antibacterial zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) species greatly enhance the barrier properties of the natural, waterproof, bio-adhesive polymer, shellac. The material demonstrated marked antibacterial contact properties and, in ex-vivo studies, effectively locked-in pre-applied therapeutics. When challenged in vivo with the polybacterial bovine wound infection ‘digital dermatitis’, Zn/Cu-shellac adhered rapidly and robustly over pre-applied antibiotic. The bandage self-degraded, appropriately, over 7 days despite extreme conditions (faecal slurry). Treatment was well-tolerated and clinical improvement was observed in animal mobility. This new class of bandage has promise for challenging topical situations in humans and other animals, especially away from controlled, sterile clinical settings where wounds urgently require protection from environmental and bacterial contamination.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group UK
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subject/639/638/298/54/990
dc.subject/692/308/575
dc.subjectarticle
dc.titleRobust rapid-setting antibacterial liquid bandages
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-09-15T15:23:19Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameScientific Reports
prism.volume10
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.75523
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-12
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41598-020-71586-7
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
pubs.funder-project-idUK Medical Research Council (MR/R005699/1)


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record