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dc.contributor.authorTalmi, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorKavaliauskaite, Deimante
dc.contributor.authorDaw, Nathaniel D
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-17T23:30:27Z
dc.date.available2021-09-17T23:30:27Z
dc.identifier.issn1072-0502
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/328200
dc.description.abstract<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>When people encounter items that they believe will help them gain reward, they later remember them better than others. A recent model of emotional memory, the emotional Context Maintenance and Retrieval model (eCMR), predicts that these effects would be stronger when stimuli that predict high and low reward can compete with each other both during encoding and retrieval. We tested this prediction in two experiments. Participants were promised £1 for remembering some pictures, but only a few pence for remembering others. Their recall of the content of the pictures they saw was tested after one minute and in Experiment 2, also after 24 hours. Memory at immediate test showed effects of list composition. Recall of stimuli that predicted high reward was greater than of stimuli that predicted lower reward, but only when high- and low-reward items were studied and recalled together, not when they were studied and recalled separately. More high-reward items in mixed lists were forgotten over a 24-hour retention interval compared to items studied in other conditions, but reward did not modulate the forgetting rate, a null effect which should be replicated in a larger sample. These results confirm eCMR’s predictions, although further research is required to compare that model against alternatives.</jats:p>
dc.description.sponsorshipDT was supported by the Royal Society IE160027. DK was supported by the University of Manchester Learning Through Research initiative. ND was supported by grant DA038891 from NIDA, part of the CRCNS program, and grant 57876 from the John Templeton Foundation.
dc.publisherCold Spring Harbor Laboratory
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.titleIn for a penny, in for a pound: Examining motivated memory through the lens of retrieved context models
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameLearning and Memory
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.75649
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-01
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1101/464388
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-09-01
dc.contributor.orcidTalmi, Deborah [0000-0002-7720-2706]
dc.contributor.orcidDaw, Nathaniel D [0000-0001-5029-1430]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.orpheus.counter10
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2024-09-17


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