Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHinton, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorBlacklock, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorDarwin, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorMcKnight, Jacoben
dc.contributor.authorWong, Geoffen
dc.contributor.authorEnglish, Mikeen
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-06T23:30:44Z
dc.date.available2021-10-06T23:30:44Z
dc.identifier.issn1355-8196
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/329068
dc.description.abstractThe social ties people have with one another (i.e. social networks) are known to influence behaviour, and how information is accessed and interpreted. It is unclear however, how the social networks that exist in multi-professional healthcare workplaces might be used to improve quality in hospitals. This paper develops explanatory theory using realist synthesis to illuminate the details and significance of the social ties between healthcare workers. Specifically we ask: How, why, for whom, to what extent and in what context do the social ties of staff within a hospital influence quality of service delivery, including quality improvement? From a total of 75 included documents identified through an extensive systematic literature search, data are extracted and analysed to identify emergent explanatory statements, from which 35 context-mechanism-outcome configurations are developed across four overarching theoretical domains. The synthesis finds that within the hospital workforce, an individual’s place in the social whole can be understood across four emergent domains: 1) social group, 2) hierarchy, 3) bridging distance, and 4) discourse. The relative position of individual healthcare workers within the overall social network in hospitals influences their capital, influence, power and agency. As such, power to bring about change is inequitably and socially situated, and subject to specific contexts. The findings of this realist synthesis offer a lens through which to understand the details of social ties in hospitals and their influence. The findings can help identify possible strategies for intervention to improve communication and distribution of influence and power, for individual, team and wider multi-professional behavioural change in hospitals.
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.titleThe social networks of hospital staff: a realist synthesisen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameJournal of Health Services Research and Policyen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.76513
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-27en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-09-27en
dc.contributor.orcidHinton, Lisa [0000-0002-6082-3151]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.counter7*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2024-10-06


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record