Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMinio-Paluello, Ilaria
dc.contributor.authorPorciello, Giuseppina
dc.contributor.authorPascual-Leone, Alvaro
dc.contributor.authorBaron-Cohen, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-21T15:33:42Z
dc.date.available2021-10-21T15:33:42Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-21
dc.date.submitted2019-02-16
dc.identifier.others13229-020-00371-0
dc.identifier.other371
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/329714
dc.descriptionFunder: Autism Research Trust
dc.descriptionFunder: NIHR Biomedical Research Centre
dc.descriptionFunder: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care East of England at Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust
dc.descriptionFunder: Sidney R. Baer, Jr. Foundation; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100001479
dc.descriptionFunder: National Science Foundation; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100008982
dc.descriptionFunder: The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center
dc.descriptionFunder: US-IT Fulbright Commission
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Background: Face individual identity recognition skill is heritable and independent of intellectual ability. Difficulties in face individual identity recognition are present in autistic individuals and their family members and are possibly linked to oxytocin polymorphisms in families with an autistic child. While it is reported that developmental prosopagnosia (i.e., impaired face identity recognition) occurs in 2–3% of the general population, no prosopagnosia prevalence estimate is available for autism. Furthermore, an autism within-group approach has not been reported towards characterizing impaired face memory and to investigate its possible links to social and communication difficulties. Methods: The present study estimated the prevalence of prosopagnosia in 80 autistic adults with no intellectual disability, investigated its cognitive characteristics and links to autism symptoms’ severity, personality traits, and mental state understanding from the eye region by using standardized tests and questionnaires. Results: More than one third of autistic participants showed prosopagnosia. Their face memory skill was not associated with their symptom’s severity, empathy, alexithymia, or general intelligence. Face identity recognition was instead linked to mental state recognition from the eye region only in autistic individuals who had prosopagnosia, and this relationship did not depend on participants’ basic face perception skills. Importantly, we found that autistic participants were not aware of their face memory skills. Limitations: We did not test an epidemiological sample, and additional work is necessary to establish whether these results generalize to the entire autism spectrum. Conclusions: Impaired face individual identity recognition meets the criteria to be a potential endophenotype in autism. In the future, testing for face memory could be used to stratify autistic individuals into genetically meaningful subgroups and be translatable to autism animal models.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.subjectResearch
dc.subjectAutism
dc.subjectIndividual identity recognition
dc.subjectFace memory
dc.subjectProsopagnosia
dc.subjectEndophenotype
dc.subjectHeterogeneity
dc.subjectSocial memory
dc.subjectTheory of mind
dc.subjectEmotion recognition
dc.titleFace individual identity recognition: a potential endophenotype in autism
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-10-21T15:33:41Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameMolecular Autism
prism.volume11
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77161
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-11
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s13229-020-00371-0
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMinio-Paluello, Ilaria [0000-0002-9197-9749]
dc.identifier.eissn2040-2392
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institutes of Health (RO1MH100186)
pubs.funder-project-idMinistero della Salute (133/GR-2009-1607360)
pubs.funder-project-idDefense Advanced Research Projects Agency (HR001117S0030)
pubs.funder-project-idHarvard Catalyst (UL1 RR025758)
pubs.funder-project-idInnovative Medicines Initiative (777394)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (RG46450)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (RG58828)


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record