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dc.contributor.authorZhao, M
dc.contributor.authorSmithson, J
dc.contributor.authorFord, Tamsin Jane
dc.contributor.authorWang, P
dc.contributor.authorWong, NYB
dc.contributor.authorKarl, A
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-23T15:29:22Z
dc.date.available2021-10-23T15:29:22Z
dc.date.issued2021-11
dc.identifier.issn1868-8527
dc.identifier.others12671-021-01734-1
dc.identifier.other1734
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/329811
dc.description.abstract<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec> <jats:title>Objectives</jats:title> <jats:p>Recent research has suggested that Chinese individuals from a collectivist culture may have a different understanding of self-compassion, which could differentially contribute to mental health. This study aimed to obtain an in-depth insight into Chinese adults’ understanding of self-compassion.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>Four online focus groups in Chinese undergraduates discussed the construct of self-compassion based on self-kindness, self-judgment, common humanity, isolation, mindfulness, and over-identification. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Chinese participants valued benign self-criticism and self-reflection when contemplating their understanding of self-compassion. Similarly, participants’ view of self-compassion dimensions can be described as dialectical in that they reflected both negative and positive perceptions in each factor rather than suggesting separate and purely negative or purely positive dimensions. There was also an overlap in the interpretation of the negative dimensions (self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification).</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title> <jats:p>The findings highlight particularities in the understanding of self-compassion in these Chinese students, which may be influenced by philosophical traditions promoting dialecticism and the dual focus on the transformation of the self and social participation. This suggests the importance of a cultural perspective when studying self-compassion and interpreting relevant research findings.</jats:p> </jats:sec>
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectOriginal Paper
dc.subjectSelf-compassion
dc.subjectCollectivist culture
dc.subjectDialecticism
dc.subjectConfucianism
dc.subjectChinese culture
dc.titleSelf-compassion in Chinese Young Adults: Specific Features of the Construct from a Cultural Perspective
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-10-23T15:29:21Z
prism.endingPage2728
prism.issueIdentifier11
prism.publicationNameMindfulness
prism.startingPage2718
prism.volume12
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77256
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-24
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s12671-021-01734-1
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidZhao, M [0000-0001-8078-6514]
dc.contributor.orcidFord, Tamsin Jane [0000-0001-5295-4904]
dc.identifier.eissn1868-8535
pubs.funder-project-idCambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) (NIHR 201024)
cam.issuedOnline2021-09-04


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