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dc.contributor.authorAudenaert, EA
dc.contributor.authorDuquesne, K
dc.contributor.authorDe Roeck, J
dc.contributor.authorMutsvangwa, T
dc.contributor.authorBorotikar, B
dc.contributor.authorKhanduja, Vikas
dc.contributor.authorClaes, P
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-24T01:03:46Z
dc.date.available2021-10-24T01:03:46Z
dc.date.issued2020-12
dc.identifier.issn2054-8397
dc.identifier.otherPMC8448428
dc.identifier.other34548927
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/329822
dc.descriptionFunder: Flemmish research foundation
dc.description.abstractThe risk for ischiofemoral impingement has been mainly related to a reduced ischiofemoral distance and morphological variance of the femur. From an evolutionary perspective, however, there are strong arguments that the condition may also be related to sexual dimorphism of the pelvis. We, therefore, investigated the impact of gender-specific differences in anatomy of the ischiofemoral space on the ischiofemoral clearance, during static and dynamic conditions. A random sampling Monte-Carlo experiment was performed to investigate ischiofemoral clearance during stance and gait in a large (n = 40 000) virtual study population, while using gender-specific kinematics. Subsequently, a validated gender-specific geometric morphometric analysis of the hip was performed and correlations between overall hip morphology (statistical shape analysis) and standard discrete measures (conventional metric approach) with the ischiofemoral distance were evaluated. The available ischiofemoral space is indeed highly sexually dimorphic and related primarily to differences in the pelvic anatomy. The mean ischiofemoral distance was 22.2 ± 4.3 mm in the females and 29.1 ± 4.1 mm in the males and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the ischiofemoral distance was observed to be a dynamic measure, and smallest during femoral extension, and this in turn explains the clinical sign of pain in extension during long stride walking. In conclusion, the presence of a reduced ischiofemroal distance and related risk to develop a clinical syndrome of ischiofemoral impingement is strongly dominated by evolutionary effects in sexual dimorphism of the pelvis. This should be considered when female patients present with posterior thigh/buttock pain, particularly if worsened by extension. Controlled laboratory study.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 2054-8397
dc.sourcenlmid: 101643347
dc.titleIschiofemoral impingement: the evolutionary cost of pelvic obstetric adaptation.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-10-24T01:03:45Z
prism.endingPage687
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationNameJ Hip Preserv Surg
prism.startingPage677
prism.volume7
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77267
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/jhps/hnab004
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidAudenaert, EA [0000-0001-5508-6743]
dc.contributor.orcidKhanduja, Vikas [0000-0001-9454-3978]
dc.identifier.eissn2054-8397
pubs.funder-project-idResearch Program of the Fund for Scientific Research—Flanders (G078518N)
pubs.funder-project-idUS National Institutes of Health (1-RO1-DE027023)
pubs.funder-project-idResearch Fund KU Leuven (BOF-C1, C14/15/081)
cam.issuedOnline2021-02-08


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International