Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIslam, Asiyaen
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-28T23:30:21Z
dc.date.available2021-10-28T23:30:21Z
dc.identifier.issn0891-2432
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/330012
dc.description.abstractDrawing upon the narratives of young lower middle class women employed in cafes, call centres, shopping malls, and offices in Delhi, this paper identifies malleability or ‘plasticity’ of the body as an important feature of contemporary service work. As neophyte service professionals, young women mould themselves to the middle/upper class milieu of their workplaces through clothes, makeup, and body language. Such body plasticity can be experienced as enabling – identifying with the image of the ‘New Indian Woman’, young women enter the bourgeoning service economy. However, they also experience this body plasticity as threatening – bodily changes to meet the requirements of work can, at times, feel inauthentic as well as be read as promiscuous by others. This paper draws attention to how women appraise plastic bodies as both generative of change and a site of labour discipline, thus offering insights into the relationship between bodies, social inequalities, and contemporary service work.
dc.description.sponsorshipGates Cambridge Scholarship
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
dc.titlePLASTIC BODIES: WOMEN WORKERS AND EMERGING BODY RULES IN SERVICE WORK IN URBAN INDIAen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameGender and Societyen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77456
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-21en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-09-21en
dc.contributor.orcidIslam, Asiya [0000-0002-1983-9944]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.counter14*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2024-10-28


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record