Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorvan der Wal, Jessica EM
dc.contributor.authorThorogood, Rose
dc.contributor.authorHorrocks, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-06T00:30:58Z
dc.date.available2021-11-06T00:30:58Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-08
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/330368
dc.description.abstractCollaboration and diversity are increasingly promoted in science. Yet how collaborations influence academic career progression, and whether this differs by gender, remains largely unknown. Here, we use co-authorship ego networks to quantify collaboration behaviour and career progression of a cohort of contributors to biennial International Society of Behavioral Ecology meetings (1992, 1994, 1996). Among this cohort, women were slower and less likely to become a principal investigator (PI; approximated by having at least three last-author publications) and published fewer papers over fewer years (i.e. had shorter academic careers) than men. After adjusting for publication number, women also had fewer collaborators (lower adjusted network size) and published fewer times with each co-author (lower adjusted tie strength), albeit more often with the same group of collaborators (higher adjusted clustering coefficient). Authors with stronger networks were more likely to become a PI, and those with less clustered networks did so more quickly. Women, however, showed a stronger positive relationship with adjusted network size (increased career length) and adjusted tie strength (increased likelihood to become a PI). Finally, early-career network characteristics correlated with career length. Our results suggest that large and varied collaboration networks are positively correlated with career progression, especially for women.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleCollaboration enhances career progression in academic science, especially for female researchers.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1958
prism.publicationDate2021
prism.publicationNameProc Biol Sci
prism.startingPage20210219
prism.volume288
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77811
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2021.0219
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-09-08
dc.contributor.orcidvan der Wal, Jessica EM [0000-0002-6441-3598]
dc.contributor.orcidThorogood, Rose [0000-0001-5010-2177]
dc.contributor.orcidHorrocks, Nicholas [0000-0003-0762-4142]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idNatural Environment Research Council (NE/K00929X/1)
cam.issuedOnline2021-09-08


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International