Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLau-Zhu, Alex
dc.contributor.authorHenson, Richard N.
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, Emily A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-12T16:47:48Z
dc.date.available2021-11-12T16:47:48Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-06
dc.date.submitted2020-11-16
dc.identifier.issn2167-7026
dc.identifier.other10.1177_2167702621998315
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/330590
dc.description.abstractIntrusive memories of a traumatic event can be reduced by a subsequent interference procedure, seemingly sparing voluntary memory for that event. This selective-interference effect has potential therapeutic benefits (e.g., for emotional disorders) and legal importance (e.g., for witness testimony). However, the measurements of intrusive memory and voluntary memory typically differ in the role of associations between a cue and the emotional memory “hotspots.” To test this, we asked participants to watch a traumatic film followed by either an interference procedure (reminder plus Tetris) or control procedure (reminder only). Measurement of intrusions (using a laboratory task) and voluntary memory (recognition for film stills) were crossed with the presence or absence of associative cues. The reminder-plus-Tetris group exhibited fewer intrusions despite comparable recognition memory, replicating the results of prior studies. Note that this selective interference did not appear to depend on associative cues. This involuntary versus voluntary memory dissociation for emotional material further supports separate-trace memory theories and has applied advantages.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rightsEmbargo: ends 2021-05-06
dc.subjectEmpirical Articles
dc.subjectintrusive memories
dc.subjectinvoluntary memory
dc.subjectmental imagery
dc.subjectmemory consolidation
dc.subjecttrauma
dc.subjectPTSD
dc.subjectopen data
dc.subjectopen materials
dc.titleSelectively Interfering With Intrusive but Not Voluntary Memories of a Trauma Film: Accounting for the Role of Associative Memory
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-11-12T16:47:48Z
prism.endingPage1143
prism.issueIdentifier6
prism.publicationNameClinical Psychological Science
prism.startingPage1128
prism.volume9
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.78034
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-01
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/2167702621998315
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-05-06
dc.contributor.orcidLau-Zhu, Alex [0000-0001-5055-8617]
dc.identifier.eissn2167-7034
pubs.funder-project-idOak Foundation (OCAY-18-442)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC-A060-5PR50)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (SUAG/010 RG91365)
pubs.funder-project-idVetenskapsrådet (2017-00957)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-05-06


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record