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dc.contributor.authorHaber, Suzanne N
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Hesheng
dc.contributor.authorSeidlitz, Jakob
dc.contributor.authorBullmore, Edward
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T10:08:27Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T10:08:27Z
dc.date.issued2022-01
dc.date.submitted2021-04-27
dc.identifier.issn0893-133X
dc.identifier.others41386-021-01156-6
dc.identifier.other1156
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/331441
dc.descriptionFunder: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
dc.description.abstractThe fundamental importance of prefrontal cortical connectivity to information processing and, therefore, disorders of cognition, emotion, and behavior has been recognized for decades. Anatomic tracing studies in animals have formed the basis for delineating the direct monosynaptic connectivity, from cells of origin, through axon trajectories, to synaptic terminals. Advances in neuroimaging combined with network science have taken the lead in developing complex wiring diagrams or connectomes of the human brain. A key question is how well these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived networks and hubs reflect the anatomic "hard wiring" first proposed to underlie the distribution of information for large-scale network interactions. In this review, we address this challenge by focusing on what is known about monosynaptic prefrontal cortical connections in non-human primates and how this compares to MRI-derived measurements of network organization in humans. First, we outline the anatomic cortical connections and pathways for each prefrontal cortex (PFC) region. We then review the available MRI-based techniques for indirectly measuring structural and functional connectivity, and introduce graph theoretical methods for analysis of hubs, modules, and topologically integrative features of the connectome. Finally, we bring these two approaches together, using specific examples, to demonstrate how monosynaptic connections, demonstrated by tract-tracing studies, can directly inform understanding of the composition of PFC nodes and hubs, and the edges or pathways that connect PFC to cortical and subcortical areas.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectReview Article
dc.subject/631/378
dc.subject/692/698/1688
dc.subject/13/51
dc.subject/14/63
dc.subject/59/57
dc.subject/59/36
dc.subjectreview-article
dc.titlePrefrontal connectomics: from anatomy to human imaging.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-12-15T10:08:26Z
prism.endingPage40
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameNeuropsychopharmacology
prism.startingPage20
prism.volume47
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.78895
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-02
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41386-021-01156-6
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidLiu, Hesheng [0000-0002-7233-1509]
dc.contributor.orcidSeidlitz, Jakob [0000-0002-8164-7476]
dc.contributor.orcidBullmore, Edward [0000-0002-8955-8283]
dc.identifier.eissn1740-634X
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_G0802534)
cam.issuedOnline2021-09-28


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