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dc.contributor.authorDoniec, Katarzyna
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-21T03:40:30Z
dc.date.available2021-12-21T03:40:30Z
dc.date.submitted2020-10-29
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/331661
dc.description.abstractThis PhD thesis examines the role of cultural values as a predictor of population health and wellbeing in a global context. Within the Social Determinants of Health (SDH) framework, several factors including social class, income and education have been studied extensively as drivers of cross-national differences in health, but much less literature exists on the role of culture and cultural values. In order to address this gap in the literature I employ a qualitative analytical approach applied to multiple waves of the World Values Survey (1979-2014). In an initial analysis, I assess whether the three most common cultural values models, those of Hofstede, Schwartz and Inglehart, are good predictors of population health outcomes. Indulgence, traditional/rational, intellectual and affective autonomy, long-term orientation and embeddedness dimensions yield largest effect sizes in predicting health outcomes. I also find a significant and large interaction effects between country’s wealth and selected cultural dimensions Secondly, I develop a novel, data-driven, computationally intensive approach to Exploratory Factor Analysis to explore whether clusters, or dimensions, of values exist, and which are the most relevant for explaining population health. Of the dimensions identified, I find that religiosity, membership in civic organisations and democratic views are the most useful for explaining global differences in health and wellbeing. Thirdly, I explore the question of autonomy. I show that two dimensions of autonomy may be identified, which I term Individual and Female Autonomy. Of the two, Individual Autonomy is a good predictor of rates of national maternal mortality and combined maternal and child mortality. Finally, I critically review and assess country-level indicators of women’s social position (also referred to in the literature as gender equality or equity, or women’s empowerment). I provide an extensive critique of the so-called ‘parity’ approach prevalent in the global health and development literature, and suggest an alternative ‘institutional’ approach as more comprehensive and socially just.
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/
dc.subjectculture
dc.subjectcultural values
dc.subjectsocial values
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectglobal health
dc.subjectreligiosity
dc.subjectdemocracy
dc.subjectautonomy
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjectWorld Values Survey
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectlife expectancy
dc.subjectHofstede
dc.subjectSchwartz
dc.subjectInglehart
dc.subjectwell-being
dc.subjectcross-country
dc.subjectgender equality
dc.subjectgender equity
dc.titleCultural Determinants of Global Health
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.date.updated2021-12-16T09:33:07Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.79112
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/
rioxxterms.typeThesis
cam.supervisorIacovou, Maria
cam.depositDate2021-12-16
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2023-01-07


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