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dc.contributor.authorVihta, Karina-Doris
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Nicola Claire
dc.contributor.authorStoesser, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorQuan, T Phuong
dc.contributor.authorTyrrell, Carina SB
dc.contributor.authorVongsouvath, Manivanh
dc.contributor.authorAshley, Elizabeth A
dc.contributor.authorChansamouth, Vilada
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Paul
dc.contributor.authorLing, Clare L
dc.contributor.authorEyre, David W
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Nicholas J
dc.contributor.authorCrook, Derrick
dc.contributor.authorPeto, Tim EA
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Ann Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-22T15:06:36Z
dc.date.available2021-12-22T15:06:36Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-03
dc.date.submitted2021-07-12
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.others41598-021-02755-5
dc.identifier.other2755
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/331701
dc.descriptionFunder: Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre
dc.description.abstractAntimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance in bloodstream infections (BSIs) is challenging in low/middle-income countries (LMICs) given limited laboratory capacity. Other specimens are easier to collect and process and are more likely to be culture-positive. In 8102 E. coli BSIs, 322,087 E. coli urinary tract infections, 6952 S. aureus BSIs and 112,074 S. aureus non-sterile site cultures from Oxfordshire (1998-2018), and other (55,296 isolates) rarer commensal opportunistic pathogens, antibiotic resistance trends over time in blood were strongly associated with those in other specimens (maximum cross-correlation per drug 0.51-0.99). Resistance prevalence was congruent across drug-years for each species (276/312 (88%) species-drug-years with prevalence within ± 10% between blood/other isolates). Results were similar across multiple countries in high/middle/low income-settings in the independent ATLAS dataset (103,559 isolates, 2004-2017) and three further LMIC hospitals/programmes (6154 isolates, 2008-2019). AMR in commensal opportunistic pathogens cultured from BSIs is strongly associated with AMR in commensal opportunistic pathogens cultured from non-sterile sites over calendar time, suggesting the latter could be used as an effective proxy for AMR surveillance in BSIs.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subject/692/308/174
dc.subject/631/326/22
dc.subjectarticle
dc.titleAntimicrobial resistance in commensal opportunistic pathogens isolated from non-sterile sites can be an effective proxy for surveillance in bloodstream infections.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-12-22T15:06:34Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameSci Rep
prism.volume11
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.79151
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-23
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41598-021-02755-5
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance (NIHR200915)
cam.issuedOnline2021-12-03


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