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dc.contributor.authorMcClelland, Stephanie C
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Miranda
dc.contributor.authorCordall, Molly
dc.contributor.authorHauber, Mark E
dc.contributor.authorGoymann, Wolfgang
dc.contributor.authorMcClean, Luke A
dc.contributor.authorHamama, Silky
dc.contributor.authorLund, Jess
dc.contributor.authorDixit, Tanmay
dc.contributor.authorLouder, Matthew IM
dc.contributor.authorSafari, Ignas
dc.contributor.authorHonza, Marcel
dc.contributor.authorSpottiswoode, Claire
dc.contributor.authorPortugal, Steven J
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-06T11:51:23Z
dc.date.available2022-01-06T11:51:23Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-27
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.otherPMC8548802
dc.identifier.other34702076
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/332168
dc.descriptionFunder: Tanzanian Commission for Science and Technology
dc.descriptionFunder: Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute
dc.descriptionFunder: NERC
dc.descriptionFunder: National Science Foundation
dc.descriptionFunder: Ministry of Education
dc.descriptionFunder: German Academic Exchange Service
dc.descriptionFunder: University of Cape Town
dc.descriptionFunder: Max-Planck-Gesellschaft
dc.description.abstractMovement of the embryo is essential for musculoskeletal development in vertebrates, yet little is known about whether, and why, species vary. Avian brood parasites exhibit feats of strength in early life as adaptations to exploit the hosts that rear them. We hypothesized that an increase in embryonic movement could allow brood parasites to develop the required musculature for these demands. We measured embryo movement across incubation for multiple brood-parasitic and non-parasitic bird species. Using a phylogenetically controlled analysis, we found that brood parasites exhibited significantly increased muscular movement during incubation compared to non-parasites. This suggests that increased embryo movement may facilitate the development of the stronger musculoskeletal system required for the demanding tasks undertaken by young brood parasites.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 1471-2954
dc.sourcenlmid: 101245157
dc.subjectEmbryonic development
dc.subjectMuscle Development
dc.subjectAvian Brood Parasites
dc.subjectCo-Evolutionary Arms Race
dc.titleEmbryo movement is more frequent in avian brood parasites than birds with parental reproductive strategies.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-01-06T11:51:23Z
prism.issueIdentifier1961
prism.publicationNameProc Biol Sci
prism.volume288
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.79614
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-04
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rspb.2021.1137
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMcClelland, Stephanie C [0000-0002-8763-2291]
dc.contributor.orcidHauber, Mark E [0000-0003-2014-4928]
dc.contributor.orcidGoymann, Wolfgang [0000-0002-7553-5910]
dc.contributor.orcidDixit, Tanmay [0000-0001-5604-7965]
dc.contributor.orcidLouder, Matthew IM [0000-0003-4421-541X]
dc.contributor.orcidSafari, Ignas [0000-0001-5157-5398]
dc.contributor.orcidSpottiswoode, Claire [0000-0003-3232-9559]
dc.contributor.orcidPortugal, Steven J [0000-0002-2438-2352]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
pubs.funder-project-idBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/J014109/1)
cam.issuedOnline2021-10-27


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International