Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChen, Shanquan
dc.contributor.authorAruldass, Athina
dc.contributor.authorCardinal, Rudolf
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-07T16:46:34Z
dc.date.available2022-01-07T16:46:34Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-01
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
dc.identifier.otherPMC8580571
dc.identifier.other34774648
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/332323
dc.descriptionFunder: NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre
dc.descriptionFunder: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Worsening of anxiety and depressive symptoms have been widely described during the COVID-19 pandemic. It can be hypothesized that vaccination could link to reduced symptoms of anxiety and/or depression. However, to date, no study has assessed this. This study aims to examine anxiety and depressive symptoms after vaccination in US adults, meanwhile test sociodemographic disparities in these outcomes. METHODS: Data from the January 6-June 7 2021, cross-sectional Household Pulse Survey were analyzed. Using survey-weighted logistic regression, we assessed the relationships between SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and anxiety and/or depressive symptoms, both on overall and sociodemographic subgroups. We controlled for a variety of potential socioeconomic and demographic confounding factors. RESULTS: Of the 453,167 participants studied, 52.2% of the participants had received the COVID-19 vaccine, and 26.5% and 20.3% of the participants reported anxiety and depression, respectively. Compared to those not vaccinated, the vaccinated participants had a 13% lower odds of anxiety (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.85, 95%CI 0.83-0.90) and 17% lower odds of depression (AOR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.79-0.85). Disparities on the above associations were identified in age, marital status, education level, ethnic/race, and income level, but not on gender. LIMITATIONS: The causal inference was not able to be investigated due to the cross-sectional study design. CONCLUSION: Being vaccinated for SARS-CoV-2 was associated with lower odds of anxiety and/or depressive symptoms. While those more middle-aged or more affluent, were more likely to show these negative associations, the contrary was observed in ethnic minorities and those with lower educational attainment. More strategic and demography-sensitive public health communications could perhaps temper these issues.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceessn: 1573-2517
dc.sourcenlmid: 7906073
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectSars-Cov-2 Vaccination
dc.titleMental health outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in the United States: A national cross-sectional study.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-01-07T16:46:34Z
prism.endingPage399
prism.issueIdentifierPt A
prism.publicationNameJournal of Affective Disorders
prism.startingPage396
prism.volume298
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.79769
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-29
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jad.2021.10.134
rioxxterms.versionVoR
dc.contributor.orcidChen, Shanquan [0000-0002-4724-4892]
dc.contributor.orcidAruldass, Athina [0000-0002-6553-659X]
dc.contributor.orcidCardinal, Rudolf [0000-0002-8751-5167]
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2517
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_PC_17213)
cam.issuedOnline2021-11-11


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record