Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVihta, Karina-Doris
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Nicola Claire
dc.contributor.authorStoesser, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorQuan, T Phuong
dc.contributor.authorTyrrell, Carina SB
dc.contributor.authorVongsouvath, Manivanh
dc.contributor.authorAshley, Elizabeth A
dc.contributor.authorChansamouth, Vilada
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Paul
dc.contributor.authorLing, Clare L
dc.contributor.authorEyre, David W
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Nicholas J
dc.contributor.authorCrook, Derrick
dc.contributor.authorPeto, Tim EA
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Ann Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-10T12:50:43Z
dc.date.available2022-01-10T12:50:43Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-03
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.otherPMC8642463
dc.identifier.other34862445
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/332550
dc.descriptionFunder: Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre
dc.description.abstractAntimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance in bloodstream infections (BSIs) is challenging in low/middle-income countries (LMICs) given limited laboratory capacity. Other specimens are easier to collect and process and are more likely to be culture-positive. In 8102 E. coli BSIs, 322,087 E. coli urinary tract infections, 6952 S. aureus BSIs and 112,074 S. aureus non-sterile site cultures from Oxfordshire (1998-2018), and other (55,296 isolates) rarer commensal opportunistic pathogens, antibiotic resistance trends over time in blood were strongly associated with those in other specimens (maximum cross-correlation per drug 0.51-0.99). Resistance prevalence was congruent across drug-years for each species (276/312 (88%) species-drug-years with prevalence within ± 10% between blood/other isolates). Results were similar across multiple countries in high/middle/low income-settings in the independent ATLAS dataset (103,559 isolates, 2004-2017) and three further LMIC hospitals/programmes (6154 isolates, 2008-2019). AMR in commensal opportunistic pathogens cultured from BSIs is strongly associated with AMR in commensal opportunistic pathogens cultured from non-sterile sites over calendar time, suggesting the latter could be used as an effective proxy for AMR surveillance in BSIs.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 2045-2322
dc.sourcenlmid: 101563288
dc.titleAntimicrobial resistance in commensal opportunistic pathogens isolated from non-sterile sites can be an effective proxy for surveillance in bloodstream infections.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-01-10T12:50:42Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameSci Rep
prism.volume11
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.80000
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-23
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41598-021-02755-5
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidTurner, Paul [0000-0002-1013-7815]
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance (NIHR200915)
cam.issuedOnline2021-12-03


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International