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dc.contributor.authorOlatunji, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorObonyo, Charles
dc.contributor.authorWadende, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorWere, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorMusuva, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorLwanga, Charles
dc.contributor.authorTurner-Moss, Eleanor
dc.contributor.authorPearce, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorMogo, Ebele RI
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Louise
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-11T00:31:23Z
dc.date.available2022-01-11T00:31:23Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-28
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/332594
dc.description.abstract<jats:p>The triple burden of malnutrition in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is partly a result of changing food environments and a shift from traditional diets to high-calorie Western-style diets. Exploring the relationship between food sources and food- and nutrition-related outcomes is important to understanding how changes in food environments may affect nutrition in LMICs. This study examined associations of household food source with household food insecurity, individual dietary diversity and individual body mass index in Western Kenya. Interview-administered questionnaire and anthropometric data from 493 adults living in 376 randomly-selected households were collected in 2019. Adjusted regression analyses were used to assess the association of food source with measures of food insecurity, dietary diversity and body mass index. Notably, participants that reported rearing domesticated animals for consumption (‘own livestock’) had lower odds of moderate or severe household food insecurity (odds ratio (OR) = 0.29 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.96)) and those that reported buying food from supermarkets had lower odds of moderate or severe household food insecurity (borderline significant, OR = 0.37 (95% CI: 0.14, 1.00)), increased dietary diversity scores (Poisson coefficient = 0.17 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.24)) and higher odds of achieving minimum dietary diversity (OR = 2.84 (95% CI: 1.79, 4.49)). Our findings provide insight into the relationship between food environments, dietary patterns and nutrition in Kenya, and suggest that interventions that influence household food source may impact the malnutrition burden in this context.</jats:p>
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleCross-Sectional Association of Food Source with Food Insecurity, Dietary Diversity and Body Mass Index in Western Kenya
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentMrc Epidemiology Unit
dc.date.updated2022-01-07T16:11:35Z
prism.endingPage121
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationDate2021
prism.publicationNameNutrients
prism.startingPage121
prism.volume14
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.80041
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3390/nu14010121
rioxxterms.versionVoR
dc.contributor.orcidOlatunji, Elizabeth [0000-0002-1758-4976]
dc.contributor.orcidObonyo, Charles [0000-0003-0741-8533]
dc.contributor.orcidWadende, Pamela [0000-0003-0846-3977]
dc.contributor.orcidWere, Vincent [0000-0002-3554-795X]
dc.contributor.orcidPearce, Matthew [0000-0003-3718-7502]
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (16/137/34)
cam.issuedOnline2021-12-28
cam.depositDate2022-01-07
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International