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dc.contributor.authorTreves, Haim
dc.contributor.authorKüken, Anika
dc.contributor.authorArrivault, Stéphanie
dc.contributor.authorIshihara, Hirofumi
dc.contributor.authorHoppe, Ines
dc.contributor.authorErban, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorHöhne, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorMoraes, Thiago Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorKopka, Joachim
dc.contributor.authorSzymanski, Jedrzej
dc.contributor.authorNikoloski, Zoran
dc.contributor.authorStitt, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-28T16:45:36Z
dc.date.available2022-01-28T16:45:36Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-23
dc.date.submitted2020-11-03
dc.identifier.others41477-021-01042-5
dc.identifier.other1042
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/333298
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Photosynthesis-related pathways are regarded as a promising avenue for crop improvement. Whilst empirical studies have shown that photosynthetic efficiency is higher in microalgae than in C3 or C4 crops, the underlying reasons remain unclear. Using a tailor-made microfluidics labelling system to supply 13CO2 at steady state, we investigated in vivo labelling kinetics in intermediates of the Calvin Benson cycle and sugar, starch, organic acid and amino acid synthesis pathways, and in protein and lipids, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella sorokiniana and Chlorella ohadii, which is the fastest growing green alga on record. We estimated flux patterns in these algae and compared them with published and new data from C3 and C4 plants. Our analyses identify distinct flux patterns supporting faster growth in photosynthetic cells, with some of the algae exhibiting faster ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate regeneration and increased fluxes through the lower glycolysis and anaplerotic pathways towards the tricarboxylic acid cycle, amino acid synthesis and lipid synthesis than in higher plants.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group UK
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subject/631/449
dc.subject/631/1647/320
dc.subject/631/449/1734
dc.subjectarticle
dc.titleCarbon flux through photosynthesis and central carbon metabolism show distinct patterns between algae, C 3 and C 4 plants
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-01-28T16:45:35Z
prism.endingPage91
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameNature Plants
prism.startingPage78
prism.volume8
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.80721
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-09
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41477-021-01042-5
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidTreves, Haim [0000-0002-3431-6965]
dc.contributor.orcidKüken, Anika [0000-0003-1367-0719]
dc.contributor.orcidErban, Alexander [0000-0003-1794-588X]
dc.contributor.orcidMoraes, Thiago Alexandre [0000-0002-7156-6947]
dc.contributor.orcidKopka, Joachim [0000-0001-9675-4883]
dc.contributor.orcidSzymanski, Jedrzej [0000-0003-1086-0920]
dc.contributor.orcidNikoloski, Zoran [0000-0003-2671-6763]
dc.contributor.orcidStitt, Mark [0000-0002-4900-1763]
dc.identifier.eissn2055-0278
pubs.funder-project-idHuman Frontier Science Program (HFSP) (LT000156/2018, RGP0046/2018, RGP0046/2018)


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