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dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Matthew D
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Kate
dc.contributor.authorSivaramakrishnan, Hamsini
dc.contributor.authorMoullin, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorAvenell, Alison
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Deborah A
dc.contributor.authorBirch, Jack M
dc.contributor.authorNtoumanis, Nikos
dc.contributor.authorQuested, Eleanor
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-21T10:00:04Z
dc.date.available2022-02-21T10:00:04Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.date.submitted2021-12-15
dc.identifier.issn1467-7881
dc.identifier.otherobr13436
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/334268
dc.descriptionFunder: Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship
dc.description.abstractWeight management interventions designed specifically for men have become more common, but the extent to which socioeconomic factors are considered in trials of these interventions is unclear. We synthesized study characteristics, methods, and reporting of interventions with a behavioral component for men that report weight as an outcome, to establish the extent to which socioeconomic factors are considered during intervention design, conduct, and reporting. A comprehensive search was conducted on Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CENTRAL for studies published from January 2000 to July 2021. Thirty-six trials were included. Educational attainment (n = 24) was the most frequently reported socioeconomic characteristic, followed by working status (n = 14) and area level deprivation (n = 12). Seven studies did not report any socioeconomic characteristics. Most studies (n = 20) did not mention the socioeconomic profile of their samples in relation to study strengths or limitations. Few (n = 4) consulted with men from lower socioeconomic groups during intervention design. One study examined potential differential intervention effects across socioeconomic groups, with most not powered to do so. Recent feasibility trials (n = 3) targeting specific socioeconomic groups suggest a potential nascent towards a greater consideration of factors related to equity. To best inform public health policy related to health inequalities, greater consideration of socioeconomic factors is required in trials of men's weight management interventions.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTH/OBESITY INTERVENTIONS
dc.subjectinequalities
dc.subjectRCT
dc.subjectsocioeconomic characteristics
dc.subjectweight management
dc.titleA systematic review examining socioeconomic factors in trials of interventions for men that report weight as an outcome.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-02-21T10:00:04Z
prism.publicationNameObes Rev
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.81681
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-28
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/obr.13436
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMcDonald, Matthew D [0000-0002-8191-8854]
dc.contributor.orcidBirch, Jack M [0000-0001-6292-1647]
dc.identifier.eissn1467-789X
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_00006/6)
cam.issuedOnline2022-02-21


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