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dc.contributor.authorBochyńska, Diana
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Sheelagh
dc.contributor.authorRestif, Olivier
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Katherine
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-11T19:00:11Z
dc.date.available2022-03-11T19:00:11Z
dc.date.issued2022-03
dc.identifier.issn1040-6387
dc.identifier.other10.1177_10406387211066923
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/334900
dc.descriptionFunder: alborada trust; FundRef: https://doi.org/10.13039/100008288
dc.description.abstractIn rabbits, a white-spotted liver can be indicative of one of several disease processes, frequently caused by parasites. To date, the prevalence of white-spotted liver in wild rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the United Kingdom is undetermined. We evaluated the prevalence and main parasitic etiologies of this entity in a U.K. population of wild rabbits. Wild rabbits (n = 87) were shot in Cambridgeshire for population control, and cadavers were donated for research. Postmortem examination was undertaken, including gross and histologic hepatic examination. Macroscopic lesions consistent with white-spotted liver were found in 46 of 87 (53%) rabbits examined; most of these lesions were considered to be mild. For 28 of 46 (59%) rabbits with gross hepatic lesions, an etiologic agent was apparent histologically. Eimeria stiedae was detected in 21 of 87 (24%) rabbits, and Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica) was detected in 7 of 87 (8%). In the subset of rabbits killed in the summer, there was a significant association between white-spotted liver and juvenile age class. There was also an association between white-spotted liver caused by E. stiedae and juvenile age class. When restricting analysis to rabbits with white-spotted liver caused by E. stiedae and submitted in the summer, both juvenile age class and female had significant effects. E. stiedae and C. hepaticum can be transmitted to pet lagomorphs via contaminated vegetation, and to humans in the case of the latter, which demonstrates the importance of monitoring the prevalence of these parasitic diseases in wild rabbits.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.subjectFull Scientific Reports
dc.subjectCalodium hepaticum
dc.subjectcoccidiosis
dc.subjectEimeria stiedae
dc.subjectliver
dc.subjectparasitology
dc.subjectpathology
dc.subjectrabbits
dc.titleEimeria stiedae causes most of the white-spotted liver lesions in wild European rabbits in Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-03-11T19:00:11Z
prism.endingPage205
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationNameJ Vet Diagn Invest
prism.startingPage199
prism.volume34
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82338
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-29
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/10406387211066923
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-01-24
dc.contributor.orcidRestif, Olivier [0000-0001-9158-853X]
dc.contributor.orcidHughes, Katherine [0000-0002-3331-1249]
dc.identifier.eissn1943-4936
cam.issuedOnline2022-01-24
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2022-01-24
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2022-01-24


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