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dc.contributor.authorWestwater, Margaret L
dc.contributor.authorMurley, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorDiederen, Kelly MJ
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, T Adrian
dc.contributor.authorZiauddeen, Hisham
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-15T16:12:00Z
dc.date.available2022-03-15T16:12:00Z
dc.date.issued2022-12
dc.date.submitted2021-09-23
dc.identifier.others41398-022-01872-7
dc.identifier.other1872
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335017
dc.descriptionFunder: Cambridge Overseas Trust; doi: https://doi.org/10.13039/501100003341
dc.descriptionFunder: NIH Oxford Cambridge Scholars Program
dc.descriptionFunder: Holt Fellowship
dc.descriptionFunder: Bernard Wolfe Health Neuroscience Fund
dc.description.abstract<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are associated with altered brain structure and function, as well as increased habitual behavior. This neurobehavioral profile may implicate neurochemical changes in the pathogenesis of these illnesses. Altered glutamate, <jats:italic>myo</jats:italic>-inositol and <jats:italic>N-</jats:italic>acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentrations are reported in restrictive AN, yet whether these extend to binge-eating disorders, or relate to habitual traits in affected individuals, remains unknown. We therefore used single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure glutamate, <jats:italic>myo</jats:italic>-inositol, and NAA in the right inferior lateral prefrontal cortex and the right occipital cortex of 85 women [<jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 22 AN (binge-eating/purging subtype; AN-BP), <jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 33 BN, <jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 30 controls]. To index habitual behavior, participants performed an instrumental learning task and completed the Creature of Habit Scale. Women with AN-BP, but not BN, had reduced <jats:italic>myo</jats:italic>-inositol and NAA concentrations relative to controls in both regions. Although patient groups had intact instrumental learning task performance, both groups reported increased routine behaviors compared to controls, and automaticity was related to reduced prefrontal glutamate and NAA participants with AN-BP. Our findings extend previous reports of reduced <jats:italic>myo</jats:italic>-inositol and NAA levels in restrictive AN to AN-BP, which may reflect disrupted axonal-glial signaling. Although we found inconsistent support for increased habitual behavior in AN-BP and BN, we identified preliminary associations between prefrontal metabolites and automaticity in AN-BP. These results provide further evidence of unique neurobiological profiles across binge-eating disorders.</jats:p>
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subject/692/699/476
dc.subject/631/477/2811
dc.subject/59/57
dc.subject/59
dc.subjectarticle
dc.titleCharacterizing cerebral metabolite profiles in anorexia and bulimia nervosa and their associations with habitual behavior
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-03-15T16:11:59Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameTranslational Psychiatry
prism.volume12
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82455
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-02-24
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41398-022-01872-7
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidWestwater, Margaret L [0000-0002-2918-0979]
dc.contributor.orcidMurley, Alexander [0000-0003-0813-0670]
dc.contributor.orcidZiauddeen, Hisham [0000-0003-4044-1719]
dc.contributor.orcidFletcher, Paul [0000-0001-8257-1517]
dc.identifier.eissn2158-3188
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (Wellcome) (206368/Z/17/Z)
cam.issuedOnline2022-03-15


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