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dc.contributor.authorAllan, Frederik
dc.contributor.authorPeschard, Anne-Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorSchiavo, Luca
dc.contributor.authorBayton, Will
dc.contributor.authorCorbetta, Davide
dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Katie E
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-19T02:06:06Z
dc.date.available2022-03-19T02:06:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1098-612X
dc.identifier.other35154801
dc.identifier.otherPMC8825244
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335200
dc.description.abstractCASE SUMMARY: A 7-year-old neutered female domestic longhair cat was presented for further investigation of suspected hepatobiliary disease. Increases in serum 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero-3-glutaric acid-(6'-methylresorufin) ester lipase and hepatobiliary enzymes, with concurrent hypoalbuminaemia, were documented on blood biochemistry. Abdominal ultrasonography findings were consistent with acute pancreatitis with multiple pancreatoliths visualised within the pancreatic duct. Treatment for suspected triaditis was initiated with a hydrolysed protein diet, amoxicillin-clavulanate, hepatoprotectants and buprenorphine. Fifty-three days later, the patient presented with hypercalcaemia and obstructive pancreatolithiasis, and was euthanased. Post-mortem examination revealed severe chronic active pancreatitis with moderate chronic lymphocytic, plasmacytic cholangiohepatitis and mild chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic duodenal enteritis (triaditis). Multiple calcium carbonate pancreatoliths present within the pancreatic ducts had resulted in pancreatic duct obstruction. RELEVANCE AND NOVEL INFORMATION: Pancreatolithiasis is a very rare condition in cats, with only five reports to date. In human medicine, pancreatolithiasis is often a sequala to chronic pancreatitis, seen in up to 50-90% of patients. However, in cats the aetiology of pancreatolithiasis, and indeed chronic pancreatitis, is poorly understood. This report describes a case of obstructive pancreatolithiasis in a cat with histopathological confirmation of triaditis and is the first report of hypercalcaemia in a cat with obstructive pancreatolithiasis. This further adds to the evidence base that pancreatolithiasis may have a similar pathogenesis to humans and can develop secondarily to chronic pancreatitis in cats.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 2055-1169
dc.sourcenlmid: 101672978
dc.subjectInternal Medicine
dc.subjectHypercalcaemia
dc.subjectPancreatolithiasis
dc.subjectTriaditis
dc.titleObstructive pancreatolithiasis in a cat with triaditis and concurrent hypercalcaemia.
dc.typeOther
dc.date.updated2022-03-19T02:06:05Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameJFMS Open Rep
prism.volume7
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82630
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/2055116921998494
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidAllan, Frederik [0000-0002-2275-8563]
dc.identifier.eissn2055-1169
cam.issuedOnline2021-03-18


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International