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dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Raymond
dc.contributor.authorDay, Thomas C
dc.contributor.authorHoehn, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorZamani-Dahaj, Seyed A
dc.contributor.authorYanni, David
dc.contributor.authorBurnetti, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorPentz, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorHonerkamp-Smith, Aurelia R
dc.contributor.authorWioland, Hugo
dc.contributor.authorSleath, Hannah R
dc.contributor.authorRatcliff, William C
dc.contributor.authorYunker, Peter J
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-28T19:05:25Z
dc.date.available2022-03-28T19:05:25Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-21
dc.identifier.issn2050-084X
dc.identifier.other35188101
dc.identifier.otherPMC8860445
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335389
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of multicellular organisms is due in part to their ability to form complex structures. How cells pack in these structures is a fundamental biophysical issue, underlying their functional properties. However, much remains unknown about how cell packing geometries arise, and how they are affected by random noise during growth - especially absent developmental programs. Here, we quantify the statistics of cellular neighborhoods of two different multicellular eukaryotes: lab-evolved “snowflake” yeast and the green alga Volvox carteri. We find that despite large differences in cellular organization, the free space associated with individual cells in both organisms closely fits a modified gamma distribution, consistent with maximum entropy predictions originally developed for granular materials. This ‘entropic’ cellular packing ensures a degree of predictability despite noise, facilitating parent-offspring fidelity even in the absence of developmental regulation. Together with simulations of diverse growth morphologies, these results suggest that gamma-distributed cell neighborhood sizes are a general feature of multicellularity, arising from conserved statistics of cellular packing.
dc.languageeng
dc.publishereLife Sciences Publications Ltd
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 2050-084X
dc.sourcenlmid: 101579614
dc.subjectS. cerevisiae
dc.subjectEntropy
dc.subjectVolvox
dc.subjectMulticellularity
dc.subjectPhysics Of Living Systems
dc.subjectSnowflake Yeast
dc.subjectYeasts
dc.subjectDirected Molecular Evolution
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectCell Size
dc.titleCellular organization in lab-evolved and extant multicellular species obeys a maximum entropy law
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-03-28T19:05:24Z
prism.publicationNameeLife
prism.volume11
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82818
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-04
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.7554/eLife.72707
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidGoldstein, Raymond [0000-0003-2645-0598]
dc.identifier.eissn2050-084X
pubs.funder-project-idEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/M017982/1)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (207510/Z/17/Z)
cam.issuedOnline2022-02-21


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International