Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKleist, Thomas J
dc.contributor.authorBortolazzo, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorKeyser, Zachary P
dc.contributor.authorPerera, Adele M
dc.contributor.authorIrving, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorVenkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian
dc.contributor.authorAtanjaoui, Fatiha
dc.contributor.authorTang, Ren-Jie
dc.contributor.authorMaeda, Junko
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Heather N
dc.contributor.authorChristianson, Michael L
dc.contributor.authorLemaux, Peggy G
dc.contributor.authorLuan, Sheng
dc.contributor.authorAné, Jean-Michel
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-28T23:30:58Z
dc.date.available2022-03-28T23:30:58Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-18
dc.identifier.issn2589-0042
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335459
dc.description.abstractSymbioses between angiosperms and rhizobia or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are controlled through a conserved signaling pathway. Microbe-derived, chitin-based elicitors activate plant cell surface receptors and trigger nuclear calcium oscillations, which are decoded by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) and its target transcription factor interacting protein of DMI3 (IPD3). Genes encoding CCaMK and IPD3 have been lost in multiple non-mycorrhizal plant lineages yet retained among non-mycorrhizal mosses. Here, we demonstrated that the moss Physcomitrium is equipped with a bona fide CCaMK that can functionally complement a Medicago loss-of-function mutant. Conservation of regulatory phosphosites allowed us to generate predicted hyperactive forms of Physcomitrium CCaMK and IPD3. Overexpression of synthetically activated CCaMK or IPD3 in Physcomitrium led to abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation and ectopic development of brood cells, which are asexual propagules that facilitate escape from local abiotic stresses. We therefore propose a functional role for Physcomitrium CCaMK-IPD3 in stress-associated developmental reprogramming.
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDevelopmental biology
dc.subjectMycology
dc.subjectPlant biology
dc.titleStress-associated developmental reprogramming in moss protonemata by synthetic activation of the common symbiosis pathway.
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Plant Sciences
dc.date.updated2022-03-28T07:53:59Z
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.number103754
prism.publicationDate2022
prism.publicationNameiScience
prism.startingPage103754
prism.volume25
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82888
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-07
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.isci.2022.103754
rioxxterms.versionVoR
dc.contributor.orcidIrving, Thomas [0000-0003-3040-4543]
dc.identifier.eissn2589-0042
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.depositDate2022-03-28
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International