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dc.contributor.authorHoenink, Jody
dc.contributor.authorWaterlander, Wilma
dc.contributor.authorBeulens, Joline WJ
dc.contributor.authorMackenbach, Joreintje D
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-28T23:31:00Z
dc.date.available2022-03-28T23:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2022-03
dc.identifier.issn2352-8273
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335460
dc.description.abstractWe examined whether material and psychosocial resources may explain socioeconomic differences in diet quality. Cross-sectional survey data from 1461 Dutch adults (42.5 (SD 13.7) years on average and 64% female) on socio-demographics, diet quality, psychosocial factors and perceptions of and objective healthiness of the food environment were used in a structural equation model to examine mediating pathways. Indicators for socioeconomic position (SEP) were income, educational, and occupational level and the 2015 Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD15) index assessed diet quality. Material resources included food expenditure, perceptions of healthy food accessibility and healthfulness of the food retail environment. Psychosocial resources were cooking skills, resilience to unhealthy food environments, insensitivity to food cues and healthy eating habits. Higher SEP was associated with better diet quality; Beducation 8.5 (95%CI 6.7; 10.3), Bincome 5.8 (95%CI 3.7; 7.8) and Boccupation 7.5 (95%CI 5.5; 9.4). Material resources did not mediate the association between SEP and diet quality and neither did the psychosocial resources insensitivity to food cues and eating habits. Cooking skills mediated between 13.3% and 19.0% and resilience to unhealthy food environments mediated between 5.9% and 8.6% of the relation between SEP and the DHD15-index. Individual-level factors such as cooking skills can only explain a small proportion of the SEP differences in diet quality. On top of other psychosocial and material resources not included in this study, it is likely that structural factors outside the individual, such as financial, work and living circumstances also play an important role.
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAdults
dc.subjectDiet
dc.subjectExplanatory factors
dc.subjectInequity
dc.subjectSES
dc.subjectSocioeconomic differences
dc.titleThe role of material and psychosocial resources in explaining socioeconomic inequalities in diet: A structural equation modelling approach.
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentMrc Epidemiology Unit
dc.date.updated2022-03-28T07:57:22Z
prism.number101025
prism.publicationDate2022
prism.publicationNameSSM Popul Health
prism.startingPage101025
prism.volume17
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82889
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-11
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.ssmph.2022.101025
rioxxterms.versionVoR
dc.contributor.orcidHoenink, Jody [0000-0003-0303-4540]
dc.identifier.eissn2352-8273
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.depositDate2022-03-28
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International