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dc.contributor.authorVan Emmenis, Miranda
dc.contributor.authorJamison, James
dc.contributor.authorKassavou, Aikaterini
dc.contributor.authorHardeman, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorNaughton, Felix
dc.contributor.authorA'Court, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorEborall, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-02T01:01:44Z
dc.date.available2022-04-02T01:01:44Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-28
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.other35228280
dc.identifier.otherPMC8886486
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335702
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To explore patients' and healthcare practitioners' (HCPs) views about non-adherence to hypertension medication and potential content of a combined very brief face-to-face discussion (VBI) and digital intervention (DI). METHODS: A qualitative study (N=31): interviews with patients with hypertension (n=6) and HCPs (n=11) and four focus groups with patients with hypertension (n=14). Participants were recruited through general practices in Eastern England and London. Topic guides explored reasons for medication non-adherence and attitudes towards a potential intervention to support adherence. Stimuli to facilitate discussion included example SMS messages and smartphone app features, including mobile sensing. Analysis was informed methodologically by the constant comparative approach and theoretically by perceptions and practicalities approach. RESULTS: Participants' overarching explanations for non-adherence were non-intentional (forgetting) and intentional (concerns about side effects, reluctance to medicate). These underpinned their views on intervention components: messages that targeted forgetting medication or obtaining prescriptions were considered more useful than messages providing information on consequences of non-adherence. Tailoring the DI to the individuals' needs, regarding timing and number of messages, was considered important for user engagement. Patients wanted control over the DI and information about data use associated with any location sensing. While the DI was considered limited in its potential to address intentional non-adherence, HCPs saw the potential for a VBI in addressing this gap, if conducted in a non-judgemental manner. Incorporating a VBI into routine primary care was considered feasible, provided it complemented existing GP practice software and HCPs received sufficient training. CONCLUSIONS: A combined VBI-DI can potentially address intentional and non-intentional reasons for non-adherence to hypertension medication. For optimal engagement, recommendations from this work include a VBI conducted in a non-judgmental manner and focusing on non-intentional factors, followed by a DI that is easy-to-use, highly tailored and with provision of data privacy details about any sensing technology used.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherBMJ
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 2044-6055
dc.sourcenlmid: 101552874
dc.subjectHypertension
dc.subjectPublic Health
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.subjectQualitative Research
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subjectMedication Adherence
dc.subjectMobile Applications
dc.titlePatient and practitioner views on a combined face-to-face and digital intervention to support medication adherence in hypertension: a qualitative study within primary care.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-04-02T01:01:43Z
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationNameBMJ Open
prism.volume12
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.83138
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-02-03
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/bmjopen-2021-053183
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidVan Emmenis, Miranda [0000-0002-4717-6746]
dc.contributor.orcidKassavou, Aikaterini [0000-0002-6562-4143]
dc.contributor.orcidNaughton, Felix [0000-0001-9790-2796]
dc.contributor.orcidSutton, Stephen [0000-0003-1610-0404]
dc.contributor.orcidEborall, Helen [0000-0002-6023-3661]
dc.identifier.eissn2044-6055
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (via Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)) (RP-PG-0615-20013)
cam.issuedOnline2022-02-28


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International