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dc.contributor.authorDENYER WILLIS, GRAHAM
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-04T08:00:14Z
dc.date.available2022-04-04T08:00:14Z
dc.date.issued2022-05
dc.identifier.issn0094-0496
dc.identifier.otheramet13071
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335727
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: Police work is obviously a question of pursuing subjects. In postslave societies, one figure dominates; police are always after the young Black man. Meanwhile, another distinctive subject of policing exists. In São Paulo, Brazil, police detectives are also worried about the failing White father. He represents a crucial kind of problem: he weakens whiteness by subjecting White children to the indignities that Black children face. His punishment is not incarceration, however. Instead, his punishment is a question of civility and reparation, of being “pedagogical.” Attention to police officers’ decision‐making about these two subjects of everyday policing shows how the long‐standing fallacy of the idealized White family is produced by extracting from the Black family. It reveals the logic of differentiated punishment—civil and reparative punishment for White men, life in prison or death for Black men and boys—as a mechanism in the constant remediation of whiteness as property and accumulation. [whiteness, policing, punishment, men, family, child support, race, São Paulo, Brazil]
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectOriginal Article
dc.subjectOriginal Articles
dc.titleEating pizza in prison
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-04-04T08:00:13Z
prism.publicationNameAmerican Ethnologist
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.83162
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/amet.13071
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.identifier.eissn1548-1425
cam.issuedOnline2022-04-03


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