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dc.contributor.authorAbubakar, Ibrahim
dc.contributor.authorDalglish, Sarah L
dc.contributor.authorAngell, Blake
dc.contributor.authorSanuade, Olutobi
dc.contributor.authorAbimbola, Seye
dc.contributor.authorAdamu, Aishatu Lawal
dc.contributor.authorAdetifa, Ifedayo MO
dc.contributor.authorColbourn, Tim
dc.contributor.authorOgunlesi, Afolabi Olaniyi
dc.contributor.authorOnwujekwe, Obinna
dc.contributor.authorOwoaje, Eme T
dc.contributor.authorOkeke, Iruka N
dc.contributor.authorAdeyemo, Adebowale
dc.contributor.authorAliyu, Gambo
dc.contributor.authorAliyu, Muktar H
dc.contributor.authorAliyu, Sani Hussaini
dc.contributor.authorAmeh, Emmanuel A
dc.contributor.authorArchibong, Belinda
dc.contributor.authorEzeh, Alex
dc.contributor.authorGadanya, Muktar A
dc.contributor.authorIhekweazu, Chikwe
dc.contributor.authorIhekweazu, Vivianne
dc.contributor.authorIliyasu, Zubairu
dc.contributor.authorKwaku Chiroma, Aminatu
dc.contributor.authorMabayoje, Diana A
dc.contributor.authorNasir Sambo, Mohammed
dc.contributor.authorObaro, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorYinka-Ogunleye, Adesola
dc.contributor.authorOkonofua, Friday
dc.contributor.authorOni, Tolu
dc.contributor.authorOnyimadu, Olu
dc.contributor.authorPate, Muhammad Ali
dc.contributor.authorSalako, Babatunde L
dc.contributor.authorShuaib, Faisal
dc.contributor.authorTsiga-Ahmed, Fatimah
dc.contributor.authorZanna, Fatima H
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-19T13:18:03Z
dc.date.available2022-04-19T13:18:03Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-19
dc.identifier.citationLancet (London, England), volume 399, issue 10330, page 1155-1200
dc.identifier.issn0140-6736
dc.identifier.other35303470
dc.identifier.otherPMC8943278
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/336178
dc.descriptionFunder: Wellcome Trust
dc.description.abstractHealth is central to the development of any country. Nigeria’s gross domestic product is the largest in Africa, but its per capita income of about ₦770 000 (US$2000) is low with a highly inequitable distribution of income, wealth, and therefore, health. It is a picture of poverty amidst plenty. Nigeria is both a wealthy country and a very poor one. About 40% of Nigerians live in poverty, in social conditions that create ill health, and with the ever-present risk of catastrophic expenditures from high out-of-pocket spending for health. Even compared with countries of similar income levels in Africa, Nigeria’s population health outcomes are poor, with national statistics masking drastic differences between rich and poor, urban and rural populations, and different regions.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcenlmid: 2985213R
dc.sourceessn: 1474-547X
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectNigeria
dc.titleThe Lancet Nigeria Commission: investing in health and the future of the nation.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-04-19T13:18:02Z
prism.publicationNameLancet
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.83603
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-04
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/S0140-6736(21)02488-0
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidAbubakar, Ibrahim [0000-0002-0370-1430]
dc.contributor.orcidTsiga-Ahmed, Fatimah [0000-0003-4207-7981]
dc.identifier.eissn1474-547X
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (16/137/34)
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (16/137/34)
cam.issuedOnline2022-03-15


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International