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dc.contributor.authorXia, Shuting
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-22T17:13:47Z
dc.date.available2022-04-22T17:13:47Z
dc.date.submitted2021-09-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/336375
dc.description.abstractSelf-employment has been regarded as a possible means of job creation and economic stimulation by the central government of China. While self-employed individuals acted as the forerunners of private enterprises in the early reform era and played a vital role in China’s market transition, the pathways to and outcomes of self-employment are conditioned by the changing opportunity structure, retreat of the socialist ideology and dominance of patriarchal norms in capitalist entrepreneurship. Using mixed research methods, I investigated China’s most recent self-employment patterns and outcomes, the disparity between self-employment entry in rural and urban regions, and the impact of institutional transformation on the opportunities available for men and women of different social groups. I argue that self-employment in contemporary China constitutes a reaction to structural disadvantages in access to the labour market and is mainly taken up by people who are socially and/or culturally discriminated against or otherwise disadvantaged. Self-employed individuals suffer from poor job quality and precarious working conditions since their low-paying jobs also tend to involve long and unsociable shifts. However, compared to waged/salaried jobs in privately-owned enterprises, self-employment generates a higher annual income and job satisfaction. It also allows greater autonomy and flexibility for women and rural-to-urban migrants in Chinese cities, while the benefits are largely offset by intensified self-exploitation, vulnerability, distraction and insecurity. I also argue that marketisation has widened the gender gap in employment outcomes and resulted in a different opportunity hierarchy for men and women in urban and rural labour markets. While drawing upon both quantitative and qualitative data, my exploration of self-employment in China during the 2010s represents the first comprehensive study examining the heterogeneity of self-employment in rural and urban China. My empirical findings give rise to new research questions and call for greater attention to the gendered pattern of self-employment participation and performance in China in an increasingly marketised era.
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/
dc.subjectSelf-employment
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectJob quality
dc.titleLabour Market Dynamics of Self-employment in China: The Interplay of Institutions and Gender
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.date.updated2022-04-20T14:45:16Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.83792
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/
rioxxterms.typeThesis
dc.publisher.collegeChrists
cam.supervisorBurchell, Brendan
cam.depositDate2022-04-20
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2023-04-22


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