Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorErady, Chaitanya
dc.contributor.authorAmin, Krishna
dc.contributor.authorOnilogbo, Temiloluwa OAE
dc.contributor.authorTomasik, Jakub
dc.contributor.authorJukes-Jones, Rebekah
dc.contributor.authorUmrania, Yagnesh
dc.contributor.authorBahn, Sabine
dc.contributor.authorPrabakaran, Sudhakaran
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T16:01:13Z
dc.date.available2022-05-12T16:01:13Z
dc.date.issued2022-03
dc.date.submitted2021-04-27
dc.identifier.issn1359-4184
dc.identifier.others41380-021-01405-6
dc.identifier.other1405
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337090
dc.descriptionFunder: Ms. Chaitanya Erady was funded by Dr Manmohan Singh scholarship
dc.descriptionFunder: Dr. Jakub Tomasik was funded by the Stanley Medical Research Institute (grant number: 07R-1888).
dc.descriptionFunder: Prof. Sabine Bahn was funded by the Stanley Medical Research Institute (grant number: 07R-1888).
dc.description.abstractSchizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder are debilitating neuropsychiatric disorders arising from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Novel open reading frames (nORFs) are genomic loci that give rise to previously uncharacterized transcripts and protein products. In our previous work, we have shown that nORFs can be biologically regulated and that they may play a role in cancer and rare diseases. More importantly, we have shown that nORFs may emerge in accelerated regions of the genome giving rise to species-specific functions. We hypothesize that nORFs represent a potentially important group of biological factors that may contribute to SCZ and bipolar disorder pathophysiology. Human accelerated regions (HARs) are genomic features showing human-lineage-specific rapid evolution that may be involved in biological regulation and have additionally been found to associate with SCZ genes. Transposable elements (TEs) are another set of genomic features that have been shown to regulate gene expression. As with HARs, their relevance to SCZ has also been suggested. Here, nORFs are investigated in the context of HARs and TEs. This work shows that nORFs whose expression is disrupted in SCZ and bipolar disorder are in close proximity to HARs and TEs and that some of them are significantly associated with SCZ and bipolar disorder genomic hotspots. We also show that nORF encoded proteins can form structures and potentially constitute novel drug targets.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subject/631/208
dc.subject/631/378
dc.subject/38/91
dc.subject/101/58
dc.subjectarticle
dc.titleNovel open reading frames in human accelerated regions and transposable elements reveal new leads to understand schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-05-12T16:01:12Z
prism.endingPage1468
prism.issueIdentifier3
prism.publicationNameMol Psychiatry
prism.startingPage1455
prism.volume27
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.84509
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-24
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41380-021-01405-6
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidAmin, Krishna [0000-0002-3726-9535]
dc.contributor.orcidTomasik, Jakub [0000-0002-2127-4487]
dc.contributor.orcidPrabakaran, Sudhakaran [0000-0002-6527-1085]
dc.identifier.eissn1476-5578
cam.issuedOnline2021-12-23


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record