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dc.contributor.authorBaciadonna, Luigi
dc.contributor.authorCornero, Francesca
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorEmery, Nathan J
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-14T15:00:24Z
dc.date.available2022-05-14T15:00:24Z
dc.date.issued2022-06
dc.date.submitted2021-08-16
dc.identifier.issn1435-9448
dc.identifier.others10071-021-01590-5
dc.identifier.other1590
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337168
dc.description.abstractMirror tasks can be used to investigate whether animals can instrumentally use a mirror to solve problems and can understand the correspondence between reflections and the real objects they represent. Two bird species, a corvid (New Caledonian crow) and a parrot (African grey parrot), have demonstrated the ability to use mirrors instrumentally in mirror-mediated spatial locating tasks. However, they have not been challenged with a mirror-guided reaching task, which involves a more complex understanding of the mirror’s properties. In the present study, a task approximating the mirror-guided reaching task used in primate studies was adapted for, and given to, a corvid species (Eurasian jay) by using a horizontal string-pulling paradigm. Four birds learned to pull the correct string to retrieve a food reward when they could see the food directly, whereas none used the reflected information to accomplish the same objective. Based on these results, it cannot be concluded whether these birds understand the correspondence between the location of the reward and its reflected information, or if the relative lack of visual-perceptual motor feedback given by the setup interfered with their performance. This novel task is posited to be conceptually more difficult compared to mirror-mediated spatial locating tasks, and should be used in avian species that have previously been successful at using the mirror instrumentally. This would establish whether these species can still succeed at it, and thus whether the task does indeed pose additional cognitive demands.
dc.description.sponsorshipTempleton World Charity Foundation (TWCF0317) Herchel Smith Postgraduate Fellowship (Harvard University)
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.subjectOriginal Paper
dc.subjectMirror studies
dc.subjectAvian cognition
dc.subjectComparative cognition
dc.subjectCorvids
dc.subjectString-pulling
dc.titleMirror-mediated string-pulling task in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius)
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-05-14T15:00:24Z
prism.endingPage700
prism.issueIdentifier3
prism.publicationNameAnimal Cognition
prism.startingPage691
prism.volume25
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.84587
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-29
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10071-021-01590-5
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidCornero, Francesca [0000-0001-7825-4746]
dc.contributor.orcidClayton, Nicola [0000-0003-1835-423X]
dc.identifier.eissn1435-9456
pubs.funder-project-idTempleton World Charity Foundation (TWCF0317)
cam.issuedOnline2021-12-16


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