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dc.contributor.authorHufnagel, Antonia
dc.contributor.authorDearden, Laura
dc.contributor.authorFernandez-Twinn, Denise S
dc.contributor.authorOzanne, Susan E
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-27T23:30:57Z
dc.date.available2022-05-27T23:30:57Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-05
dc.identifier.issn0022-0795
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337580
dc.description.abstractObesity and gestational diabetes during pregnancy have multiple short- and long-term consequences for both mother and child. One common feature of pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity and gestational diabetes is maternal hyperinsulinaemia, which has effects on the mother and her adaptation to pregnancy. Even though insulin does not cross the placenta insulin can act on the placenta as well affecting placental growth, angiogenesis and lipid metabolism. Obese and gestational diabetic pregnancies are often characterised by maternal hyperglycaemia resulting in exposure of the fetus to high levels of glucose, which freely crosses the placenta. This leads to stimulation of fetal ß-cells and insulin secretion in the fetus. Fetal hyperglycaemia/hyperinsulinaemia has been shown to cause multiple complications in fetal development, such as altered growth trajectories, impaired neuronal and cardiac development and early exhaustion of the pancreas. These changes could increase the susceptibility of the offspring to develop cardiometabolic diseases later in life. In this review, we aim to summarize and review the mechanisms by which maternal and fetal hyperinsulinaemia impact on (i) maternal health during pregnancy; (ii) placental and fetal development; (iii) offspring energy homeostasis and long-term cardiometabolic health; (iv) how interventions can alleviate these effects.
dc.format.mediumElectronic
dc.publisherBioscientifica
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectdevelopmental programming
dc.subjectfetal hyperinsulinaemia
dc.subjectgestational diabetes
dc.subjectmaternal hyperinsulinaemia
dc.subjectpregnancy
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectFetal Development
dc.subjectFetus
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHyperinsulinism
dc.subjectPlacenta
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.titleProgramming of cardiometabolic health: the role of maternal and fetal hyperinsulinaemia.
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Clinical Biochemistry
dc.date.updated2022-05-27T12:53:04Z
prism.endingPageR63
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationDate2022
prism.publicationNameJ Endocrinol
prism.startingPageR47
prism.volume253
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.84989
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-03-08
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1530/JOE-21-0332
rioxxterms.versionVoR
dc.contributor.orcidOzanne, Susan E [0000-0001-8753-5144]
dc.identifier.eissn1479-6805
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_UU_12012/4)
pubs.funder-project-idBritish Heart Foundation (RG/17/12/33167)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (106026/Z/14/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (108926/B/15/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idBritish Heart Foundation (PG/20/11/34957)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_00014/5)
cam.issuedOnline2022-04-05
cam.depositDate2022-05-27
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International