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dc.contributor.authorHinton, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorMcmanus, Richard
dc.contributor.authorChappell, Lucy
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorSandall, Jane
dc.contributor.authorHodgkinson, James
dc.contributor.authorGreenfield, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorMcCourt, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-06T23:30:07Z
dc.date.available2022-06-06T23:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-03
dc.identifier.issn0098-7484
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337704
dc.description.abstractAbstract Importance: Inadequate management of elevated BP is a significant contributing factor to maternal deaths. Self-monitoring of blood pressure (BP) in the general population has been shown to improve the diagnosis and management of hypertension, however little is known about its use in pregnancy. Objective: To determine whether self-monitoring of BP in higher risk pregnancies leads to earlier detection of pregnancy hypertension. Design, setting and participants: Unmasked, randomised clinical trial that recruited between November 2018 and October 2019. 2441 pregnant individuals at higher risk of pre-eclampsia were recruited at 20 weeks’ gestation from 15 hospital maternity units in England with final follow-up in April 2020. Interventions: Participating individuals were randomised to either BP self-monitoring with telemonitoring (n=1223) plus usual care or usual antenatal care alone (n=1218) without access to telemonitored BP. Main Outcomes: The primary outcome was time to first recorded hypertension measured by a healthcare professional. Results: Among 2441 participants who were randomized (mean age, 33; median gestation 20 weeks), 2346 (96%) completed the trial. The time from randomisation to clinic recording of hypertension was not significantly different between individuals in the self-monitoring group (mean 104 days) vs the usual care group (mean 106 days) (mean difference -1.6 days (95% confidence intervals -8.1, 4.9, p = 0.6). Eighteen serious adverse events were reported during the trial with none judged as related to the intervention: 12 (1%) in the self-monitoring group and 6 (0.5%) in those receiving usual care. Conclusions and relevance: Among pregnant individuals at higher risk of pre-eclampsia, blood pressure self-monitoring with telemonitoring compared with usual care did not lead to significantly earlier clinic-based detection of hypertension
dc.description.sponsorshipNIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
dc.titleEffect of self-monitoring of blood pressure on diagnosis of hypertension during higher-risk 2 pregnancy: the BUMP 1 randomized trial
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Public Health And Primary Care, This Institute
dc.date.updated2022-03-18T11:26:45Z
prism.publicationNameJAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.82588
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-03-14
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1001/jama.2022.4712
rioxxterms.versionAM
dc.contributor.orcidHinton, Lisa [0000-0002-6082-3151]
dc.identifier.eissn1538-3598
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (via University of Oxford) (BZR01300)
cam.issuedOnline2022-05-03
cam.orpheus.success2022-08-03: Embargo correct
cam.depositDate2022-03-18
pubs.licence-identifierapollo-deposit-licence-2-1
pubs.licence-display-nameApollo Repository Deposit Licence Agreement
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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