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dc.contributor.authorDel Bianco, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorMason, Luke
dc.contributor.authorLai, Meng-Chuan
dc.contributor.authorLoth, Eva
dc.contributor.authorTillmann, Julian
dc.contributor.authorCharman, Tony
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorGleissl, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorBuitelaar, Jan K
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Declan GM
dc.contributor.authorBaron-Cohen, Simon
dc.contributor.authorBölte, Sven
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Mark H
dc.contributor.authorJones, Emily JH
dc.contributor.authorEU-AIMS LEAP Group
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-07T08:10:19Z
dc.date.available2022-06-07T08:10:19Z
dc.date.issued2022-12
dc.date.submitted2021-07-02
dc.identifier.issn0021-9630
dc.identifier.otherjcpp13630
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337733
dc.descriptionFunder: Medical Research Council; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Social attention affords learning opportunities across development and may contribute to individual differences in developmental trajectories, such as between male and female individuals, and in neurodevelopmental conditions, such as autism. METHODS: Using eye-tracking, we measured social attention in a large cohort of autistic (n = 123) and nonautistic females (n = 107), and autistic (n = 330) and nonautistic males (n = 204), aged 6-30 years. Using mixed Growth Curve Analysis, we modelled sex and diagnostic effects on the temporal dynamics of proportional looking time to three types of social stimuli (lean-static, naturalistic-static, and naturalistic-dynamic) and examined the link between individual differences and dimensional social and nonsocial autistic traits in autistic females and males. RESULTS: In the lean-static stimulus, average face-looking was higher in females than in males of both autistic and nonautistic groups. Differences in the dynamic pattern of face-looking were seen in autistic vs. nonautistic females, but not males, with face-looking peaking later in the trial in autistic females. In the naturalistic-dynamic stimulus, average face-looking was higher in females than in males of both groups; changes in the dynamic pattern of face looking were seen in autistic vs. nonautistic males, but not in females, with a steeper peak in nonautistic males. Lower average face-looking was associated with higher observer-measured autistic characteristics in autistic females, but not in males. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found stronger social attention in females to a similar degree in both autistic and nonautistic groups. Nonetheless, the dynamic profiles of social attention differed in different ways in autistic females and males compared to their nonautistic peers, and autistic traits predicted trends of average face-looking in autistic females. These findings support the role of social attention in the emergence of sex-related differences in autistic characteristics, suggesting an avenue to phenotypic stratification.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectOriginal Article
dc.subjectOriginal Articles
dc.subjectAutism
dc.subjectsocial attention
dc.subjecteye‐tracking
dc.subjectsex differences
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectfemale
dc.titleUnique dynamic profiles of social attention in autistic females.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-07T08:10:18Z
prism.publicationNameJ Child Psychol Psychiatry
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85142
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-03-25
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/jcpp.13630
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidDel Bianco, Teresa [0000-0002-7162-0042]
dc.contributor.orcidLai, Meng-Chuan [0000-0002-9593-5508]
dc.contributor.orcidCharman, Tony [0000-0003-1993-6549]
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7610
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/T003057/1)
cam.issuedOnline2022-05-30


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